Gouging the Honeycomb in the Deeps

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by litefoot, Aug 11, 2012.

  1. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    I just did the first full inspection (pulling most of the frames) in a two-deep, two-medium super colony in about a month. I've been into the supers checking on the honey progress about every week or so, but I've left the deeps alone since the colony appeared to be very active with sustained numbers. When I pulled the outside frames (1 and 10) in the top deep, I ripped a gouge into outside (toward the hive wall) honey comb because of bridging comb. There is a larger gap on the outside of the frames when I have them all pushed together toward the center. Anything I can do differently?
     
  2. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    no the. Combs will be fine the bees will repair the damage you're going to have minor bridging from the wall to the comb, which is better than having that same bridging comb between middle frames which is what you would have had you not squeezed the frames together.
    Barry
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Exactly what Barry said. :thumbsup:

    Bees will repair in no time. Sometimes I will look down the side and try to slice off any bridge comb with my hive tool to minimize the damage to the comb but it is really no big deal. If you are going to have bridge comb, this is where you want it, not in the areas where the queen might be.
     
  4. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    You may also want to try removing frames #2 & 9 first. These are less likely to have the bridging (burr) comb. Then you can use the hive tool to lever the outside frames horizontally away from the side. It will still tear the comb where it is attached to the side, but it may be less damage because you are not pulling up.

    To be honest, I have no evidence that this (less damage) is true. It sounds reasonable to me, though! If you try it, let me know.
     
  5. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    With brand new equipment the 10 frames pushed together will leave a large space on the side but buy next year when the bees have built up propolis on the sides of the frame bars you will bee wishing you had more room on the sides. It doesn't seem to mater how badly we muck up a frame the bees will rebuild them. Most the time with drone size cells thou.