granularized honey or crystallized honey in the combs

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Lburou, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    A lot of the honey in my hives is uncapped and crystallized. Any problems for the bees over Winter? If the mountain camp method works, I don't see a reason that honey won't make bees in Spring, do you?
     
  2. Wolfer

    Wolfer New Member

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    I've always felt that they could work with it. My bees generally put up some aster in the fall which I suspect is cristalized by spring. Woody
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    They will liquefy it as needed.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    years ago when we took bees to the dakotas the domesticated sunflowers would make a nice yellow honey that would crystalize in the comb almost overnight at the first cold spell. it always seems to make for a good first feeding the following spring time. I assumed at the time that some source of water was likely necessary for the conversion just as it would be for dry sugar or candy boards.
     
  5. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    To take Tec's post a little further whether the honey is crystallized or still liquid, the bees add moisture to the honey while converting it to bee food. Also as the honey crystallizes in the comb the moisture is still in the cell surrounding the crystals. 90+ Deg temperatures will re-liquify honey as the cluster moves staying in contact with the stored honey the cluster will be positioned on the stored honey. The cluster temp of 95 deg is maintained by the bees so the cluster heat alone will re-liquify the honey as the bees are consuming it.