Greyhounds

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by PerryBee, May 30, 2011.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I have been the fortunate caretaker (I hate the word owner when it comes to animals) of a great dog, Rosie (son named her :mrgreen: ) formerly known as Mohican Dimple. She is a retired greyhound.
    Anyone looking for a companion that is all but maintenance free, consider adopting one.
    They are advertised as a 45 mph couch potatoe and live up to the rep.

    A little video to persuade you maybe (sound must be on)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdpMzPmf ... re=related
     
  2. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    Understand they make great pets.
    However we were cautioned at Southland Track, West Memphis Ar. that they may/would chase down a small dog if they saw it running.

    Also some one said they needed to be on a leash, or a fenced in yard.

    Darn shame the breeders are in it only for the winning/raceing money.

    Murrell

    Ps The races are neat, someday when we go there gonna have to bet a coupe of dollars.
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I have heard the same thing murrell has about them chasing running small animals. They closed all 3 of our greyhound parks in kansas. They had an adoption program at the track for them. I also knew a guy that had a pet cougar he would go up and buy ground up dog meat from the track to feed the cougar. That was enough for me to hear. I never went to the track after that. His saying was what doesnt win on saturday is ground up monday.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Murrell is correct, they make great pets.
    They do require being on a leash when not in an enclosure.They have a strong prey instinct that is difficult for them to overcome but with time it does get better. Many of the tracks now incorporate resident cats, etc. to get the dogs used to small animals before adoption. Rosie was tested "cat safe", we have 2 cats, (Chiclet and Diesel).
    You are getting a dog that may be 3 or 4 years old, but they have the "education" or brain of a 3 or 4 month old dog.
    Rosie had no idea what any dog other than a greyhound was cause she had never seen anything but greyhounds. She avoids them all, but if she sees another grey she starts to whine and if they get together they actually lean against each other and will rest their heads on one another, pretty funny to watch.
    She had never been in a home, still doesn't do stairs (most don't, except open outside steps to a deck or something).

    The Rat is correct also. Thousands of these dogs are destroyed every year simply because they start to slow down. They are perfectly healthy, just not as fast as they once were.
    But slowly and surely that is changing. Many tracks are shutting down and only the responsible ones that actually have the animals welfare at heart survive.
    That's a good thing!
     
  5. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    We too adopted a retired Greyhound, Eddie. He came from the Woodlands Racetrack in Kansas City, KS. Before that, he had raced in Wichita, KS. I might add that an adoption kennel worker came to the house and did an inspection to make sure the environment was suitable. Eddie had been at the adoption kennel for several years before we adopted him. They never gave up hope that someone would adopt him. He had a habit of taking people by the hand and leading them to his kennel. This habit scared most people with small children. My son and I loved it. My son was 11 at the time and he used the money he saved to adopt the dog.
    Eddie turned out to be the best dog. I used to love to watch him run circles in the back yard. What a show off.
    One characteristic I found fascinating. Eddie didn't seem interesting in other ordinary dogs. But, when another greyhound was around it was like being at a family reunion! He was a totally different dog. He was very social, but only with other greyhounds.