Hand protection

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by crazy8days, Aug 9, 2013.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I'm wondering what most keeps use as hand protection? Last year I used the leather palm gloves with the cloth sleeve. What a pain! Finally, blew out the thumb. The start of this year I went to using nitrite gloves like you would use doing dishes. They work great! I have a better feeling for the bees. Lately, I've been using surgical gloves or no gloves at all. Seems the fingers stick less to the propolus than gloves, but you got sticky hands.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Shoes, socks, pants, and sometimes a shirt.
     

  3. RayMarler

    RayMarler New Member

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    I am a smoker with callouses. :D
     
  4. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Bare hands, but with my Mann Lake gloves close-by.
    The occasional sting? Sure. I think of that as preventive treatment for arthritis. :grin:
     
  5. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Just nitrile gloves or none occasionally. If you squeeze a bee they can readily pin you either way; it makes you more careful than when wearing leather or heavy vinyl but I use these when shaking and brushing bees pulling off honey.
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Nitrile or bare hands. The nitrile only work to keep my hands clean, they sure don't stop stings. :lol:
     
  7. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    nitrile or bare handed is the way to go
     
  8. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Goat skin gloves, stings on the back of my hands is about the only place i swell,and the itching drives me crazier than i am. Jack
     
  9. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    You are a lot easier on the bees when you work bare handed! I just got a sting on the thumb about an hour ago cause I pinched a bee. I also knocked over a frame I stood against the hive and immediately
    filled the air with bees. I do appreciate having a veil on at times like that.
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Last year I switched (after many years of working with leather gloves) to surgical gloves. Actually, I wanted to go gloveless (for the reasons others mentioned) but found the propolis just too annoying during work and especially after. The surgical gloves give VERY minimal sting protection but help me to live with the propolis. Because of the better sense of feeling (relative to leather gloves) stings to the hands are reasonably infrequent. When I finish working the hives and peal off the gloves, my hands are sweaty, but clean.
     
  11. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    no gloves for the most part, if they are telling me gloves are needed then leather gloves go on. Funny how females are always telling you what to wear!
     
  12. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Haven't worn gloves yet. Only my first year but so far just one sting. I've worked them in shorts mostly and just put my coat and veil on. I smoke my exposed skin before going in. I think my girls are fairly docile. My bother bought an established hive after his last dwindled to nothing. The new hive went crazy on him on his first inspection. It seems to be more what your bees are willing to allow you to get away with.
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    if the girls are a bit cranky I use ventilated gloves... the cow hide ones seem to last the best. most times however I don't use gloves and this is actually good for my arthritis.
     
  14. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Heavy nitrile chemical gloves, I'm actually fair at navigating the hive with them on.. I would think arthritis immunity if I hadn't developed a mid-life allergy to anemones and had to give up my reef tank. I don't want to, and won't, go through the shots for a bee allergy so I would just as soon not trigger one.
     
  15. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    crazy,
    it will be sometime before i will ever feel comfortable working bees again without gloves, i hope someday i can. also, after keeping russian bees, the gloves went on more often than not, depending on what work is/was being done, spring and fall definitely, or like tecemseh said cranky bees. checking supers, etc, not so much. your bees will tell you when to wear them, and your reactions, how comfortable you are, whether you tolerate the stings or not and whether you want to tolerate them. there really is no glove that is not sting proof.

    i like what g3 said: "if they are telling me gloves are needed then leather gloves go on. Funny how females are always telling you what to wear!"
    ......
    :lol:

    anyway, i have lots of pairs of gloves. like jack and gunsmith, i have some pairs of goat skin gloves (i think), with nylon up the sleeve, i think from mann lake, these are very soft and supple, look like cowhide but are goatskin, i think? i like them. i also have several pairs of the leather ventilated gloves like tecumseh mentioned and they last the best. these gloves i keep around for those that help me with the bees. still a good glove for heavier work and cranky bees. gloves are an annoying part of keeping bees......but so are the stings....:lol:

    whether wearing gloves or not, it helps to lightly smoke the ends of the frame or frames i want to pull as i go, to move the bees. less chance of crushing, smashing, making them cranky or being stung. :grin:
     
  16. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    River, I like my gloves from Mann Lake like you are describing. They are "Meyers" brand. I am careful but have not been stung yet through them. I was stung this spring through the vents in my old pair. Won't be wearing vented gloves again.
     
  17. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    yeah dave, i am not sure where i purchased these, but i think mann lake, and have a couple pairs, like them for how soft they are. i have never been stung through the vents of the vented gloves i own, just on the fingertips or palm of them when they get a little more used and stiff. anyway, another point to add about being stung on the fingers, or hands, you can't really afford to be stung with your occupation. :grin:
     
  18. SkyeFeetham

    SkyeFeetham New Member

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    Thanks for these tips i have a bee nest in my garden and i use to get honey from them, your suggestions for hand protection are really useful for me because it's really painful when they bite on hands while moving them from honey.

     
  19. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Seems like stings to the back of my hands hurt / affect me worse than anywhere else. I tried the bare hand approach but just couldn't tolerate the stings and, as Jack said, the annoying itching that followed a sting. I always wear a veil and after my failed experiment going gloveless, I always wear the vented leather gloves while working the bees.
     
  20. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Wayne, give it a few more years of building up confidence in the way you handle your hives. It makes all the difference in the world as to getting stung. It takes a while to get used to having the bees crawl all over your hands and still work calmly enough so as not to set them off. No rush to go gloveless. When you decide to try it again (because of the inconvenience of gloves) that will be soon enough. :thumbsup: