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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The commercially available woodenware comes with a handle milled into all four sides. I come from a machining background and was intrigued at the geometry of the milled handles. The commercial milled geometry can not be reproduced very easily. The commercial geometry seems to be the most efficient water shedding geometry.

This may be obvious, but I have yet to see someone offering an alternative to the complex commercial geometry. I have seen square edged milled oval pockets.

Here is what I think is pretty easy.

[attachment=0:6ob0ovgu]P2210001.JPG[/attachment:6ob0ovgu]

The bottom routed edged will shed water to the apex. The only vulnerable area is at the bottom apex. I say let the paint pool there and you have a long lasting handle that shouldn't rot.

Throw darts at it, I'm thick skinned.

Thanks
Bill
 

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Is the top part of your handle cut deeper than the bottom part? Other than that, they look good!
I have seen several ways of mimicking the commercial handle cutouts, some not so safe. I think Zulu posted some pics of a "sled" that looked easy to use.
Some, like tecumseh use cleats which are easier to install, but make stacking hives close together impossible. Makes 'em tricky to wrap too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No, just routed in about 5/16" deep. I haven't made much equipment. Just experimenting with medium super size, because I had a bunch of 1 by material laying around. It sems to be difficult to find material (read very cheap) to make deep hive bodies. All the outlets I have tried seem to rival the commercial prices.

On another note, Perry you seem to be one heck of nice fella. Always something constructive to add.

If that is a self portrait in your avitar, how do you keep the bees out of that beard. Just foolin'...

The wife and I have always wanted to visit the Bay of Fundy region, how far are you from there?

Bill
 

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Yup, that's me alright! I haven't caught any bees in the beard, I think they don't like gray and leave it alone! :lol:
Bay of Fundy is only 10, maybe 15 minutes away. Highest tides in the world, 52 feet! That's right 52 feet!
Boats tied up at the wharves are right at the top and hours later they are sitting on mud, only held up by rope.
They have tidal bore rafting and stuff as well, hitch a ride on the wave coming in.
Awesome thing to see. It would make for a great trip (hint, hint). :mrgreen:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Iddee, I had not seen this thread
 

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I myself think those style of handles are a bad joke. I myself prefer wood lugs attached to the two ends of the box over any handle anyone could possible design. ergonomics was quite evidently not in the language when the cut in handles were first developed.
 

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I like the ideas of cleats tec, but where we get plenty of rain/snow, etc. they would just end up being places where water would collect and pool. I agree wholeheartedly that cleats make for easier carrying, installing, etc. but then you would also have trouble wrapping. For me stacking wouldn't be an issue because I run telescoping covers and can't really push mine tight together when moving anyways.
Now down where you are, the land that rain forgot :( , I can easily see the benefits of using cleats.
 

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I don't know if it's only me, but I never use handles on the sides. Front and back, and that's it.
I definitely prefer cleats over milled in ones, however only half of my boxes (all deeps) have cleats.
Those are honey supers.(more handling) When I have more time I hope to install them on my brood boxes as well.
 

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Hi Bill, I have been going over old threads to catch up with things around here. I saw your thread about handles. I bet I spent a week researching how to cut the scallops like commercial bodies. I was not going to risk my fingers by running them the wrong direction over a blade and did not care to spend $75 for a "flared contoured wheel." Those are sold mainly by Oliver company (http://www.olivercorp.com/rubberhog_products_details.cfm?category_ID=16). I am not for certain, but believe this is what is used for commercial bodies or something like it. I opted for plunging 3/8" with my router in an oval shape. I made a jig and away I went. I know water could cause issues sitting on the bottom ledge but frankly I think it would take along time to rot especially since they are painted. As a modification for draining, I thought about making an irrigation mark, if you will, on the bottom middle ledge with two hits of a chisel to make an open wedge or running a small round file up and own across the edge a few times. Iv'e attached a pic below of the practice stock...yes, that knot was fun to cut. Just my two cents....
bee hive handle.jpg
 

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If I where to this myself with a hand router I would make a jig to run off of a collet and would cut or belt sand the jig to make the transition from deeper to shallower cutting it at an angle. So you would have a jig that mimics the " factory " hand holds. By tapering the jig for the router you will be able to get the deeper cuts on the upper section and the shallower cuts on the lower parts.
 

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Sounds like you are hired to work on this project, be sure to check the mailbox for you check :lol:

Seriously though, if you have a good idea for making factory looking hand holds we would like to see them.
 

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It would actually take a tapered jig that would fit on the hive body and a tapered base plate on the router itself to get the top inside of the hand hold to be in a horizontal plane.
 

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It would actually take a tapered jig that would fit on the hive body and a tapered base plate on the router itself to get the top inside of the hand hold to be in a horizontal plane.
Or a dovetail bit, and a taper jig, That would allow an under cut for handle and taper it to zero cut at lower side of the handle.
 

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Or a dovetail bit, and a taper jig, That would allow an under cut for handle and taper it to zero cut at lower side of the handle.
When I first started think about how to do this I was going to use one of my custom bits that we use to receive a french cleat. Well that would not do anybody else any good. So i am going to redraw the jig to use an off the self dovetail bit and a ball nose bit. When I go back to work on Monday I will see if I can make a jig to accomadate a flat router base and get the same results of a factory hand hold.
 
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