Has anyone here had success with...

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Versipelis, Apr 10, 2015.

  1. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

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    Smaller cell size keeping in-check or total elimination of Varroa mites?
     
  2. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    doesn't work for me. I run a lot of Mann Lake PF-100's and it doesn't appear to be any better for mites than the rite cell. I like it for other reasons. Tighter brood nest with more cells is the main reason. If I had SHB I might feel differently.
     

  3. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

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    Thank you for your insight. As far as I can understand her, Dee Lusby swears it's the cure. I've wondered, if there was anything to it.
     
  4. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    I use the standard mann lakes rite cell and have not treated my hives with anything for anything in 4 years, I use the "survival of the fittest" approach to mites and has served me well, now at 70 strong hives and hope to hit 100 by the end of spring
     
  5. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Micheal Bush (bushfarms.com?) claims good things also.
    I'm a 4th year treatment free Beek, running modified Pierco plastic frames, because I like the idea of 11 frames and more bees. I can't claim any advantages, only because I've nothing to compare it with. Genetics has to play a large part in Honey Bee survival.
     
  6. Melissaejacklyn

    Melissaejacklyn New Member

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    What's a "modified plastic frame"?
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Betting he drilled a beesize hole in the bottom corners, facilitates movement in the hive. Worst thing about plasticell (which I use except when I am going foundationless wedge wood frames) is that the bees have to take the LONG way around bottom or top to move from frame to frame.
    when bees build comb without foundation or with wax foundation they make an opening here and there so they can navigate quicker
     
  8. David34

    David34 New Member

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    I tried small sells but still have mites. Honey from onion is good against mites.
     
  9. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Sorry I missed your question. I built a jig and cut the plastic frames down to 1 1/4 thick. The standard is 1 3/8.
    11 frames X 1 1/4 = 13 3/4 width
    10 frames X 1 3/8 = 13 3/4 width
     
  10. Guba

    Guba New Member

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    I never heard of this, has it been proven?
     
  11. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I would say honey from onion would be hard to come by, my bees do work my seeding onion and garlic and they still have mites but they work a lot of stuff
     
  12. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    You wouldn't want Dee's bees from the videos I've seen. Highly aggressive, certainly Africanized. I believe that's a big part of her success. Also her location is very arid which may help.