Have a cutout question

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Oct 3, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Just got a call from someone that lives a little over a mile from me. He has an open air colony about 8ft off the ground.
    Its hanging from tree limbs. He says it has 6 pieces of comb.

    I'm going to get this afternoon.

    My question is, with it being 1 or 1.5 miles from my house. Will the bees reorient of you think they will go back the the original spot.

    Probably one of my hives or my neighbors that swarmed back in the spring.:lol:
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    This time of year, going back may be better for the hive. Only the foragers are oriented to the old spot. They are summer bees who have nothing to do but eat when the flow is over. The house bees are your winter bees and need all the food the foragers would be eating. Take the colony home and don't worry about the returnees.
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    the bees will reorient for the most part as they will should not readily recognize old navigational locations. The fact that they will be leaving the hive thru the entrance close to ground level faced in a set direction, will cause the bees to reorient to the new hive and its location before they randomly fly off. Make sure that you have the queen or they may all abscond and go back and join the queen if she is left behind.
     
  4. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Great points. Hadn't thought about the foraging bees or the forced entrance/exit.

    She probably has capped brood and I can add some from my strong hives to help her if I need to. Feed them for the next month or so and they should make it fine.

    This will be our first open air colony. Can't wait. May have to sneak away from day job a little early today.

    We'll be sure and get the queen. I hope she has a big yellow mark on her back. My neighbor had marked queens that swarmed out on him in the spring.:grin:

    I'll post a few pictures when done.
     
  5. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I'm thinking of putting them in a medium. I have medium boxes full of pulled comb (from last harvest). That way they done have to pull any comb.
    I can feed and she can lay much quicker.

    Will move them into a deep in spring.
     
  6. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    A very good plan.except that if will limit being able to pull brood of honey frames from other colonies. If you had some medium frames of honey to give them to replace the honey from the open comb.
     
  7. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Yeah I have a couple hives with some medium frames of honey and brood.
    Here a few pictures. Phone didn't focus to well.

    20131003_174032.jpg 20131003_174208.jpg 20131003_175132.jpg
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Not to many bees or brood in the swarm may have been a late swarm and hasn't had time to build up much. with an added frame or 2 of brood and lots of honey or syrup it would be a over winterable nuc.
    Thanks for the nice photos
     
  9. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    I've never seen an open air colony. Very interesting. Thanks for the pictures.