have a removal

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by Zookeep, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    its about 12 feet up and has to be the biggest hive Ive seen in the wild hanging from something out in the open, the pic does not show the size well, owner pf the property said they swarmed about a month ago so I am going to wait another week and see if it requeened before I take them
     

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  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Still hard to imagine colonies building out in the open like that. How would they ever defend?
    Amazing.
     

  3. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    I just watched a video on youtube of JPthebeeman doing a removal of an open colony like that in New Orleans. Must be a southern thing.
     
  4. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Is Florida still messing with you on removals?
     
  5. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    yes they are still screwing with us, got to remember, Florida has the best state officials money can buy, and oboy are they bought all the time, EPA, dept of agriculture, not going to do a thing unless its absolutely right (for there pockets) PCOs have big money but screw them, Ill do close by removals for free rather then let govt idiots and the PCOs get there way and kill all the wild bees:thumbsup:
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Good for you! :thumbsup:
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Why are the combs totally exposed? Has something gone wrong the the colony that the population is so small? Obviously they were at one time very strong to build so many combs, so well, so fast, but being able to see so much of them exposed doesn't predict that you're going to get a good hive from them.
    I hope I'm wrong.
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    yes leave them another week and you can salvage the bees with a laying queen and render the wax and save the honey. It would have been nice to have been told about it before it swarmed It was a big hive.
     
  9. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    great photo! like perry said amazing the bees build this out in the open.....what would you call this one zoo? tree-o-bees?! :lol:
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    My apologies :oops:--I read the opening post so fast that I misunderstood the hive to have formed from a swarm about a month ago. Apis has it right wait and hope you get what remains of the tree hive together with a fertile queen, with honey and wax as bonuses.
     
  11. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    That type of swarm/colony probably will not make it through the winter on its own here in North Texas. We had three calls about similar colonies between 15 and 25 Oct this year, all shedding large pieces of comb in a wind storm. The pictures of the 25 ft location are attached. The colonies each produced 2.5 - 4 pounds of bees, the queen was recovered in only one of the colonies.

    This was the bee colony as seen on arrival, then, showing queen cells after vacuuming, and finally the set-up for a loction 25 foot above the ground. We had two additional similar recoveries within a half mile radius. One at 28 feet and another at 35 feet (really). I will be on the lookout for the colony that is producing these swarms next Spring. Will be setting out bait hives.
     

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  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Nice pics. Challenging removal. Did you take the comb down piece by piece, or get a large basket with a couple of long poles attached and cut the branch?

    (at 35 ft, I'm intimidated - height is not my thing.)
     
  13. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Florida is looking amazing. Did they figure out who won the election there yet?

     
  14. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    The colony was too high for a normal retrieval (without a scaffold). We vacuumed then used a rectangular garbage can attached to an extendable pole to bring the comb down.

    The combs were (purposely) loosened by the vacuum and fell into the garbage can and then placed in frames. The 28' & 35' colonies were slightly different. the garbage can was used to dislodge the comb after vacuuming. Was not something to be proud of. After the comb was removed, the limbs were trimmed using a sawzall on the end of the extendable pole (didn't take a picture because we did not want to make the red neck hall of fame ;) ).

    I did not intend to hijack your post Zookeep :)
     

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  15. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    hahaha. Lee - that is how I'd have had to do it, but the sawzall on the extendable pole is dangerous. I think I'd have taken the limb closer in to the trunk if the homeowner permitted. More weight, but less height and safer.
     
  16. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Noticed many queen cells on the larger comb beware of crippling after swarms--this time of year even in Texas will be tough on small colonies.
    Barry
     
  17. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    Yes, you could be correct. Our theory was that the queen was likely on one of the combs that fell to the ground, the timing was right. :)