Heat Wave

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Slowmodem, Jun 27, 2012.

  1. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    It is very hot in the plains and heartland of the US and the heat is moving eastward, with temps of 103F forecast for here this weekend. I have already put popsickle sticks under my hive tops, and there's a good water supply nearby (Tennessee River) available for the bees. Should I be concerned about the temps in the hives? They're in full sun nearly all day.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Not much more you can do Greg. Maybe shift the top box forward or backward a bit to open up a defensable gap to aid in airflow. I think your bees will be OK.
     

  3. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    Starting to get warm here: was 107 yesterday. The bees seem to be doing fine; they have ventilation and water sources. I waited until it cooled off to 102 before doing some gardening and shredding.

    Walt
     
  4. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    I am concerned also, my weakes hive has a screen bottom and top on it so not so much concern about that one, the other hive has solid bottom with a screen top but I still put a 3/4 space over the top board to raise the cover more to let the heat out, hope this will help keep them cooler, they are already covering the front in the evening when it gets hot.

    kebee
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Bees carry water into the hive to evaporate and cool the hive. Then they circulate the hot, wet air out the front door and dryer air in. Do you have upper ventilation in your house when the AC is on?
     
  6. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    There is a local guy here that sells a home made dooma hickey. It is a fan that fits below the hive that blows up softly. It is run off of solar. The theory is that few bees fanning air into the hive, the more bees gathering honey. I have always wanted to try one, but I haven't. Has anyone here used anything like this?
     
  7. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    A friend of mine uses plastic hive entrance feeders full of water on each of his hives so his bees don't have to go anywhere for a water supply.

    The bees use them extensively. On hot days, they are piled up on these as if it were syrup on a new package needing to draw out 10 frames.
     
  8. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    That sounds like a great idea!
     
  9. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    "dooma hickey" ??????? :rolling: :lol: :rolling:

    Now I know how that's spelt! :mrgreen:
     
  10. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I wouldn't put a fan of any kind on my hive I think. Too much that could go wrong.
    But I like the hive front waterer. I had so many bees on a pond plant the other day my grandkids thought I had a new hive in the pond. I have one screened bottom board to make, but their solid board does have a screened opening near its center.
     
  11. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    I don't think I do so much at prop the lid open. The bees knew how to ventilate the hive before, I'd hate to make them learn something new in the middle of a heatwave.
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I propped the lid open for a day last year in our record heat. Stayed that way til 2 hours later when I took something back out there, I found wax moths on the bottom of the cover. I built them a screened vent chamber afterward. But with my migratory's with feed jars, a little heat doubtless escapes around the jar (screened with #8 hardware cloth on interior side), and a little out the sides. Seem to be doing well, sun and all. It was 106 yesterday. NOT a good time for hive inspections, never mind the suit, I have some foundationless frames reinforced with fishing line. Not lifting those at 100 degrees...

    Gypsi
     
  13. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    Yes Iddee I do have ventilation on my house with the air on to draw the hot air out of the attic, helps the ac I would say, now with the top proped up the girls can fan the heat up out out of the top, since heat rises.

    kebee
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    mind numbing heat here. with the heat index and humidity it was 114 here yesterday (108 by the thermometer at my front door). the 100+ is suppose to be gone tomorrow. we will see.
     
  15. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :shock: :shock: :shock:

    tec, you should come up for a visit. it went up to a bit over 70 F here today (with the heat you must be used to you might want to bring a parka) :lol:
     
  16. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    long handles and a parka perhaps. heck I don't even own a parka.

    the upside of the high temperature is bee quick works really quick.
     
  17. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Hot temps here tomorrow also. I plan on keeping an eye on the water I have in the bee yard. Bees have gone through the water quick this week. I hardly ever see bees in my pool and three of them showed up a couple days ago. I discovered why later that evening...the water feeders were dry as a bone in the bee yard.

    We have had the complete opposite situation from Florida. I can't remember the last time it rained. The grass is toasty. Most of Indiana is under burn bans....
     
  18. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Kebee, I doubt you have a way for the cool room air to get into the attic. With the hive, you are letting the air they have cooled go out the top. Top vents may help, or may harm. I see about as many cons as I do pros. I will continue to keep the bottom entrance open and let the bees handle it.

    TO EACH HIS OWN. That's what makes beekeeping so interesting.
     
  19. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    I have noticed that humidity seems to have more effect on the bees than temp does. This Spring, temps in the 90's with high humidity, I saw some minor bearding. The last couple of days with temps over 100 there has been no bearding, but the humidity was low. Last year we had nearly 3 months of temps over 100 but very low humidity. Again, no bearding. There are some that hang out on the porch, but nothing to compare to the bearding I've seen in pictures.
     
  20. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    an Iddee snip..
    I see about as many cons as I do pros.

    tecumseh:
    I think??? as we have discussed at previous time almost anything you do will have + and - consequence and then the test for each of us individually is to calculate if the + are greater or less than the -.

    I do like top entrances since they tend to limit crowding in the bottom box and I also see some significant ventilation benefit from having 9 frames in a box. having neither in a hive here almost invariable translates into having one frame on the very outside of the box melt down completely.

    having lived a good portion of my life 'back east' I will say that most eastern born folks have no idea of the intensity of the sunshine from here going west. it is difficult to describe but here the sun beats on you at this time of year... as you move into southern Arizona or New Mexico shade shelters use to be fairly routine in set down bee keeping operation and breeze boards (in those places) is not something to help in taking bees off of supers but is a means of adding some breeze to the hives themselves. by description (from another very much older beekeeper) these 'breeze boards' were essentially screen tops positioned in such a way as to take advantage of some prevailing breeze.