Heater Bees

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Charles, Jun 18, 2010.

  1. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    An interesting story:

    Excerpt:

    ... Using new technology that allows scientists to see the temperature inside the bee hives, researchers have been able to see how heater bees use their own bodies to provide a unique form of central heating within a hive. ...

    Full Story:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildli ... ealed.html
     
  2. kiaralynn

    kiaralynn New Member

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    wow.. i was so amazed by everything that was stated in the article... hmm thanks for the share huh :goodpost:
     

  3. wfuavenger

    wfuavenger New Member

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    I always thought worker bees did a little bit of everything depending upon their age. Starting of as nurse bees and doing various jobs around the hive and ultimatley ending as foragers.... I find this research interesting because it dictates which job in the hive a bee will be likely to perform.
     
  4. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    I was under this impression too. Thanks for sharing the article.
     
  5. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Fascinating! I would be interested to see how they made all these measurements, and tracked individual bees to determine their function. Hopefully the show will air in the US someday soon.

    I couldn't help but think that if a human's job were determined before birth, life might be less complicated. Of course, with my luck, I'd be a "carriage whip maker."
     
  6. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    knew that bees can provide thier own heat and in the winter can maintain as much as 85 -90 degrees in center of cluster fror limited brood rearing didn't think was needed for brood development in notrmal bee breeding season, know that in reptiles, eggs that get more heat--but by a very few degrees develop into females for the most part, and those incubated at lower temp become for the most part become males as for increased foragers, my understanding was all bees would become foragers as a result of the aging process, with age the bees develop certian glandular activity that either provides for brood rearing or wax secretion, or allows for foraging the ensymes for changing nectar into honey. Perhaps this is old thinking and modern science has since debunked but is my understanding of how they work and nothing seen recently aside from this article, says anything other then what I previously learned--still a facinating article as I can readily see how it fits into bee biology..
    Barry
     
  7. SoMDBeekeeper

    SoMDBeekeeper New Member

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    Here is a video they did on the subject (same group of researchers I susspect) that has nice production values. Particularly interesting is the FLIR camera images inside the hive and how the heater bees get their "tanks filled" with honey by house bees to keep the fires burning. Very cool stuff...

    -=Craig