Hello everyone

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Todd, Jan 13, 2009.

  1. Todd

    Todd New Member

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    My GF has decided she wants to raise Bee's. So, not knowing a thing about it I thought easy enough, a little research on the net, build a hive and I will have honey in no time. After spending the last 6 hours on the net, I realize that was wrong again.....3rd time today. I had no idea I would have to learn a whole new vocab in addition to how complicated this seems to the newbee. I will admit that I am now facinated with the few articles I have read/websites visited and I am looking forward to my new venture. I believe I will order the Beekeeping 101 book for a better understanding but I do have a few questions so far. Any response would be greatly appreciated.

    1. Living in a wet winter climate, should I protect the hive in any way from moisture?

    2. At this point, I am guessing I will start the hive with a package of bees. Should I start with just one hive and expand or would I be better off with a few? If a few should I buy 2 queens or raise my own?

    3. I am on 2 1/2 acres so I really don't have to worry about neighbors but what about other livestock? How far should the hives be placed from rabbits/hogs and chickens?

    4. I would like to build my own hives, are there different types of hives that would be benificial to my climate? Would I be better off building a NUC hive and going from there?

    5. I am sure that this probably varies widely but reading the 70# of honey should be left in the hive for the bees to winter, approcx how much honey in addition to this will I get my 1st year per hive?

    Thanks for any answers.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    1. Living in a wet winter climate, should I protect the hive in any way from moisture? Only by providing ventilation holes so the bees can protect themselves.

    2. At this point, I am guessing I will start the hive with a package of bees. Should I start with just one hive and expand or would I be better off with a few? If a few should I buy 2 queens or raise my own? It is best to start with 2 "two" packages or nucs

    3. I am on 2 1/2 acres so I really don't have to worry about neighbors but what about other livestock? How far should the hives be placed from rabbits/hogs and chickens? Chickens help with pests by eating insects from the hives, but won't eat bees. Rabbits are fine. Hogs will rub against hives, so don't place hives inside the lot.

    4. I would like to build my own hives, are there different types of hives that would be benificial to my climate? Would I be better off building a NUC hive and going from there? There are Langstroth and topbar. Nucs will come later.

    5. I am sure that this probably varies widely but reading the 70# of honey should be left in the hive for the bees to winter, approcx how much honey in addition to this will I get my 1st year per hive? Expect 0, if surprised, it will be a good surprise.
     

  3. dogsoldier13

    dogsoldier13 New Member

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  4. 1of6

    1of6 New Member

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    :lol: Tell us about the first 2 times! :lol:

    The proper ventilation system. Choices are Screened Bottom Boards, bottomless hives, notched inner covers, propping the outer cover up just a bit, and many more. Start simple.

    Packages or nucs from a local producer if you can get them. Nucs give you the benefit of an already establilshed hive with emerging brood, and already has some drawn comb and a proven queen. Order a package if nucs are all sold out. Place your order soon!

    They'll forage for a mile or two in all directions, easily. I look at it as you always should consider your neighbors. Some of them have pools whre they won't want bees congregating to drink. Be sure to provide a water source in/near your beeyard. Practice good swarm management by eliminating congestion in your hives, and be sure to gather swarms quickly and educate your neighbors. Share your honey with them as well - your bees are foraging on their property too.

    Building them is fine, but since dimensions, tolerances, etc. are so critical, I would suggest buying 1 of each piece to use as a template, and to have on hand for comparison. You'll be glad you did. Start simple. No need for buildingg a nuc box right away. If you purchase a package or a nucleus colony, put them in a full-size box or they'll get crowded/congested and swarm right away.

    If you take honey off your hive the first year, they may well not have enough to make it through the winter. They may surprise you but it's best to not ask Santa for anything until the second year. In my area (PA) 100lbs is a safe wintering amount. That number varies in other areas depending on bee race, climate, colony size, and length of winter.