Hello

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by BuzzMe, May 3, 2010.

  1. BuzzMe

    BuzzMe New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My name is Dwain or BuzzMe on this site. I have one new hive but I don't have my bees yet. They are going to be mailed (posted) on the tenth. I hope someone can tell me if Agave Nectar and water is OK to spray on my bees when I hive them. Thank You.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I don't know what agave is, but why would you spray it on your bees?
     

  3. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Agave is a plant that grows in the desert areas and many folks are using the nectar of that plant as a natural sweetener. I don't know that it would hurt the bees Buzz, but I think that personally I would stick with the sugar syrup that is tried and true. For the bees to take that while they were out foraging would be one thing.....kinda like when you see them in trash cans on drink cups etc, but to spray it on them when you hive them is kind of force-feeding them a foreign substance that they may or may not be able to digest or tolerate. Just my opinion.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would assume Agave nectar would be fine. it should make better tequilla than bee syrup spray.
     
  5. BuzzMe

    BuzzMe New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello and Thank you all for your replies.

    Iddee - Hello again. Spraying bees with syrup before you hive them, I have read, helps to calm and occupy the bees; reducing their stress. Also, adding HoneyBHealthy, again I have read, is a more natural (Organic) way to control mites - http://www.wvu.edu/~agexten/varroa/
    Also the syrup/HBH "drenching" is said to help facilitate queen acceptance.

    Mama Beek - Yes. Yours is a very wise thought on all accounts. Thank you for that simple insight. Perhaps I will offer them the nectar option at a later date (in a drink cup) and let you all know how receptive they are.

    tecumseh - I think the bees may prefer Mead. I imagine that they leave the tequila to airline pilots and actresses. :shock:
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have read that also, but fail to see how drenching with a sticky, gooey syrup helps relieve stress. Maybe I'm wrong, but I think I will continue installing them dry.
     
  7. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We've tried it both ways, as far as I can tell a light mist of syrup on those extra hot and dry days late in the season seems to be a little bit of a help..... we still smoke them though. Also if you are wanting to take a good long look at the bees while they are holding still a light mist of the syrup will get them to hold still for a bit. LIGHT MIST, being the key because if you spray them too hard or too much they will become very aggravated!

    I ain't knocking what anybody else does or don't do, just sharing our experience.
     
  8. BuzzMe

    BuzzMe New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello Iddee - yes, of course you will continue with the method that you know and trust. If I had even one days actual experience with bees I might know more of which to speak. I have only read a few books and a couple hundred web pages. Obviously you know how to do these things and achieve the desired results. Perhaps I will discover that some or even most of the methods that I have decided to try in the art of beekeeping are in fact redundant or unnecessary. Until I do have a couple seasons of practical experience under my belt I will by necessity need to follow the guidance of books. Truly I wish only to manage a couple hives, perhaps reap some pollen, beeswax and of course honey. However, In response to your question concerning the Light Misting - :hi: Mama B- it seems to be widely accepted that the bees are calmed because a natural frenzy in their disposition to find and secure food stuffs is artificially satisfied as they clean the sticky, gooey syrup from one another; also believed to be an instinctive behavior.
    --Or so I have read :)

    Thank you all for you help on this matter.
     
  9. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hmmm, I'm not sure if I agree with the whole thought the bees are driven by a "frenzy" to find food to the extent that the syrup spraying is supposed to stop them and keep them calm while you work them though. Like I said, give it a try...but experience has shown us that it still pays to have the smoker going and right handy. Many times the bees are only momentarily slowed, then rapidly irritated for whatever reason.

    One example: We had a hive that had been acting a little bit unusual in the activity at the porch and excessive bearding. We assumed they needed more room, thought it would be a quick in and out job and took a spray bottle of syrup a hive tool, and a super with frames and foundation. Opened up the hive, sprayed the bees lightly with the syrup and were promptly engulfed by a massive cloud of bees that managed to fill both mine and my daughter's veils and send both boys running off into the woods with so many bees swarming around their heads that I couldn't even see their faces to know if they were okay. Wanna know how idiotic I felt standing there with a spray bottle of syrup misting frantically as bees stung me and my kids multitudes of times? :chased:

    I'm not saying that syrup is bad, or that it isn't helpful, only that it isn't the best thing ALL of the time. Turns out that the hive that behaved so aggressively that day was really irritated by tractors that were plowing the field behind it early that morning and we didn't know about it. We have since learned to stay in touch with the fellas who work over there and always always always have the smoker going just in case the bees are extra cranky.

    I used to think that I could teach myself anything with the right books, and for most things in life that is totally true. I have however decided that when it comes to bees my old medical training rules are best applied.....see one, do one, teach one. Meaning learning from seeing how a more experienced beekeeper handles the bees is hands down the best way to learn, and even then the learning curve is HUGE!

    There are quite a few beekeepers associations all over the country, I bet there is one in your area and that you would learn a lot and enjoy meeting other beekeepers! It is truly worth checking into, you meet some really great people and get a great idea of what it's actually like to work with the bees versus what someone else wrote in a book for the purpose of making a living. Again, just my two cents. :hi:
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for your friendly and gentle reply, Buzz. You will do fine with them. As Mama beek said, try to find a local club or a couple of local beeks to visit with. Maybe even help a beek or two when they are going in their hives. And relax, the bees will inform you quickly when you are wrong. :shock: :D
     
  11. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It just goes to show you... "You never can tell with Bees."
     
  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    a buzzme snip...

    Iddee - Hello again. Spraying bees with syrup before you hive them, I have read, helps to calm and occupy the bees; reducing their stress. Also, adding HoneyBHealthy, again I have read, is a more natural (Organic) way to control mites - http://www.wvu.edu/~agexten/varroa/
    Also the syrup/HBH "drenching" is said to help facilitate queen acceptance.

    tecumseh - I think the bees may prefer Mead. I imagine that they leave the tequila to airline pilots and actresses.

    tecumseh:
    a couple of 'commercial' folks I know regularly spray their bees upon opening a hive and they 'think' it encourages grooming and mite control to some degree. I have used the same mix as a temporary substitute for a smoker (left in the shop).

    'the girls' may prefer mead but they have never tasted the home brew tequilla I use to acquire in northern Mexico (oddly enough while I and a crew of folks were trying to trap panthers). I would never think of sharing that fine brew with bees, nor pilots, nor actresses.
     
  13. Helen

    Helen New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi. I just got my bees on Friday the 30th and found that lightly spraying them with sugar water in a 2arts water to 1 part sugar really helped calm them down. From being shipped and then driven over 60 miles in my car to get home, they were buzzing LOUDLY. I lightly sprayed both sides of the package and left them alone in a cool, darkish basement for about an hour. When I came back, they were very quiet and calm. I sprayed them again about 5 minutes before I installed the package and it really helped. I made it through the whole process (in a VERY shakey manner) without a single sting!!! Good luck!