Help! Getting rid of an africanized hive?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by John Howard, Jun 28, 2017.

  1. John Howard

    John Howard New Member

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    It's a long story, but I will try to make it short. I have a hive of africanized bees. It was here when I bought my land 10 years ago. The previous owner had a hive that he kept that became africanized and he just abandoned it and left it alone. I have long thought about what to do about it and even considered trying to work it to get honey, but no longer.

    After 10 years, they decided to attack me for no reason. They came after me while I was brush mowing on my old Ford 8N tractor with a shredder. I have mowed like this for 10 years and they have never attacked me before, but they did this time.

    They hit me hard and fast. I instinctively jump off my tractor and took off running (leaving my tractor to go off unmanned and crash). They were all over me. Fortunately I had safety goggle and a full face breathing mask (I have grass allergies). After about a hundred yards I stopped, but they were still after me. I ran another 200 yards to my stock pond and jumped in. Only then did they stop chasing me.

    I ended up with 42 stings.

    Fortunately, I am not allergic to bees, but I now very concerned about this hive. They had never attacked anyone until this. I have walked by them and worked around them hundreds of time over the years so I felt they were not very aggressive. Now I know different. This could have been a very bad situation had it been someone else that did not know how to get away from them by breaking the pheromone trail by jumping in the water like I did.

    I want this hive gone. I know I can simply poison them out and get rid of them, but I would like to know if there are other options. For one, I would like to get the honey. There is possibly 30 to 40 pounds of honey in this hive. Is there a way to kill the hive and save the honey?

    What about converting the hive by introducing a new queen? I have heard that this can be done. Is this possible?

    Any other suggestions are welcome, as long they end up with no more africanized bees on my land. Thanks.
     
  2. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    you can wait till winter with the freezing temps, the bees will be very slow to sleeping, if you open the hive the cold will kill them off and you can use the honey, no poison used..
     

  3. John Howard

    John Howard New Member

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    That's a good idea, but I was hoping for a more immediate solution. Thanks though. I'll keep it in mind.
     
  4. ccjersey

    ccjersey New Member

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    I think you could get someone or a couple of folks with full good bee suits and have them rob them out. I have no experience with africanized bees, but people do work them in areas where they are the predominant bee.

    I don't think they are totally immune to smoke. Anyone know?

    Once the honey is gone, a small dose of Seven dust in the hive or permethrin will eliminate the bees if the bee keepers don't want to try requeening them.
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    They are not immune to smoke. However smoke only slows them down.

    An excellent bee suit, and rob them out.

    Don't take your suit off when you get in the truck. Drive away with those frames in the back, maybe down the high way.

    Go back with a bucket of soapy water if you really want to get rid of them, I don't use pesticides. I generally don't use soapy water, but I had a hive of africans that I couldn't put a feed jar on top of and they were attacking when we opened the bee yard gate.

    And ahem, don't leave your bee bucket handy when you dump the soapy water in. African queen moved into mine with a couple of cups of bees. Eventually I shop vacced them.

    It was about a 2 month fight from picking up that swarm. Fortunately I put a queen excluder on the bottom board when I brought them home, as they stung me 14 times through my jeans when I attempted to pick the swarm up without a full suit. That was advance Warning: but yes I did contract to remove them, So I went home and got a full suit and a bee vac but they would not be tamed. I fed and cared for them for 2 months. Took a few stings too
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have requeened extremely hot and likely part african bees, but these were the worst. In that 2 months time they drew no comb, put up no honey, but constantly created more bees. I could not find the queen, am about 100% sure they would have killed the new queen, and with the sheer number of them, and the visiting grandchildren, I threw in the towel on that one.
     
  7. John Howard

    John Howard New Member

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    Thanks for all the advice. I got rid of them. Here how I did it. I went on a cool night with a bee suit and covered the hive up with a 3 mil thick piece of plastic. I then covered the bottom of the plastic with dirt to seal them in. The next morning I went back with a shop vac and sucked up all the soldiers bees until there were none left. I sprayed some wasp killer down the nozzle of the shop vac to kill the bees in there. Then I opened the hive up and rob the honey and destroyed the hive. Once the plastic was on, it was easy after that.