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Hi there,

I am a new beekeeper and my bees just swarmed, so I am looking for advice on what to do next.

The backstory: I was given a used Langstroth hive which included 2 deep boxes and 8 medium supers, 2 outer and inner covers, and 2 bottom boards, so I'm thinking the former owner used this as 2 hives. I scraped out both deep boxes and ten frames, and got the hive set up with 10 frames in the first deep, a mason jar feeder on top of those fames, and an empty deep box covering the feeder, then the inner and outer covers on top of the empty deep box.

I found a local guy who sold me a package of honeybees with their queen. I took them home and installed them immediately into the bottom deep box, following videos I had previously watched, which told me to take the cork out of the queen cage and install her, then shake in the rest of the bees. I did this, replace the frames, filled the feeder, covered the hive, and went on with my day. They settled in immediately. This was around 1 pm on Saturday.

On Sunday, at about 3 pm, we noticed many bees flying up into a nearby lodgepole pine tree! They swarmed within a about 15 minutes and they are still there. After a ton of reading on why this may have happened, I'm thinking I released the queen too soon.

Now, I'd like to capture the swarm but I have a few questions:

If I manage to capture it (it's about 15 feet up in the tree), can I put it back into the original hive box, or should I prepare the second deep box to place the swarm into, and basically have 2 hives?

If I manage to catch the swarm, is it likely to swarm again?

How long will the swarm stay put? They've now been in that same place for about 18 hours. How much time to I have to accomplish all this?

Again, I'm new to this, so my plan is to gently saw off the branch that the swarm is on and lower it into a box, then transfer the bees into the hive box.

Thanks in advance for any advice!!!

Elizabeth
 

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This is actually the start of my second year of bee keeping but I will take a stab at it for you. To my understanding, you should have released the Queen slowly by letting the worker bees eat away the candy over a few days time. This allows the bees to accept the Queen at their own leisure and to establish their new area as their home.. There are many videos on youtube showing how to place the Queen cage into the new hive when you install your packaged bees. Where are you located ? You might include your location to better answer some questions you may have. For instance, here in Ohio, my bees swarmed in March and April during a few warm days. I was lucky enough to capture them as the landed on a fence post before taking off to their new swarm location.I understand that when they swarm they will land close to their Apiary just briefly as this is just their bivwhack area before moving on so you should capture them as soon as possible. Just be careful doing it though because your safety is everything. Question yourself, are they worth capturing at this point ? Don't risk falling and getting hurt.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much for your reply. I live in Oregon and we did just get into our warmer spring weather in the last few days.
The swarm stayed put until yesterday afternoon, and then I was lucky enough to watch it take flight! It's gone now, and as you said, I did question myself and just didn't feel that I could safely capture this swarm.

At the least, I learned quite a bit and will know how to do things differently next time.
 

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I have 7 swarm traps set up around the farm in order to catch swarms but my two swarms this year came from the same hive,my original number one hive and both swarms landed on an inside fence post for their bivwhack area so I was able to catch both swarms easily. This is my second swarm off the hive and I took this picture after I had already put most of the bees in the box. The ramp is for the rest of the bees to walk into and join the other girls..
Plant Tire Tree Grass Wood
 
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Hi there,

I am a new beekeeper and my bees just swarmed, so I am looking for advice on what to do next.

The backstory: I was given a used Langstroth hive which included 2 deep boxes and 8 medium supers, 2 outer and inner covers, and 2 bottom boards, so I'm thinking the former owner used this as 2 hives. I scraped out both deep boxes and ten frames, and got the hive set up with 10 frames in the first deep, a mason jar feeder on top of those fames, and an empty deep box covering the feeder, then the inner and outer covers on top of the empty deep box.

I found a local guy who sold me a package of honeybees with their queen. I took them home and installed them immediately into the bottom deep box, following videos I had previously watched, which told me to take the cork out of the queen cage and install her, then shake in the rest of the bees. I did this, replace the frames, filled the feeder, covered the hive, and went on with my day. They settled in immediately. This was around 1 pm on Saturday.

On Sunday, at about 3 pm, we noticed many bees flying up into a nearby lodgepole pine tree! They swarmed within a about 15 minutes and they are still there. After a ton of reading on why this may have happened, I'm thinking I released the queen too soon.

Now, I'd like to capture the swarm but I have a few questions:

If I manage to capture it (it's about 15 feet up in the tree), can I put it back into the original hive box, or should I prepare the second deep box to place the swarm into, and basically have 2 hives?

If I manage to catch the swarm, is it likely to swarm again?

How long will the swarm stay put? They've now been in that same place for about 18 hours. How much time to I have to accomplish all this?

Again, I'm new to this, so my plan is to gently saw off the branch that the swarm is on and lower it into a box, then transfer the bees into the hive box.

Thanks in advance for any advice!!!

Elizabeth
I was taught that if you return a swarm of bees too close to their original place they will just swarm again. They need to be relocated 203 miles away. And, they don't usually stay put more that 24 hrs, so you may need to get them ASAP. Good luck.
 
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