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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I sure did! =) When do you think I should put in the queen excluder? I don't want to go out there and bother them again too soon, but I really enjoy working them.
 

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I don't use excluders, but I would say when you see them drawing comb in the super. Definitely not before. They need to know it is part of their home before blocking it off with the excluder.
 

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i recommend getting into the hive the first year as much as you feel like. Its a great learning process and most generally you cant mess it up to where the bees cant fix it
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Well, I must say I will be very very anxious to see how they're going to repair some of the damage to the frames I extracted today. I'm continually fascinated by the things they can do. My fiance gets a real kick out of how excited I get over different things. Splittling the hive was a really exciting venture. I was constantly looking at my calender to figure out what day it was in the process and if I had a queen yet or if she was on her mating flight, etc. =) I would love to raise queens one day, but I have no idea how to market them to others...... I love puzzles, challenges, and working with my hands. That sounds like beekeeping to me! =)
 

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You start raising queens by using them in your splits and nucs until you get 20 plus hives. By then you will have people asking for them. Word spreads from there and you have a market.
 

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bwwertz writes:
I was constantly looking at my calender to figure out what day it was in the process and if I had a queen yet or if she was on her mating flight, etc. =) I would love to raise queens one day, but I have no idea how to market them to others...... I love puzzles, challenges, and working with my hands.

tecumseh:
yep you have definitely been bit by the bug.

do give queen rearing a shot. it does take (imho) a certain basic resource in bees (which if you was me would be job numero uno right now) to raise queens but invariable queen rearing will make you a better beekeeper for exactly some of the reasons you suggest in the above snippet.

start attending various bee club in your general area and only market your product to them. create yourself a punch list of qualification of attributes that would be economically and personally useful for your particular area. have the member of the clubs you attend add plus and negatives to your punch list. begin rearing or buying stock that addresses the points on this list.

get to know the commercial folks that may be around you and who may or may not attend the bee clubs. they have resources that you can typically tap into for modest amounts of money. their resource can give you flexibility even thought you may have few bees yourself.

I do like to encourage folks to rear a few queens... they may not raise the very best of queens in the world, but they invariable come out of the process a much better beekeeper than they were prior to rearing queens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Thank you, Te! Great advice! It's just the getting out and talking to others is the hard part for me. I'm only 34, but still quite a bit of a homebody and a hermit! =)
 
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