Hi everybody

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by pistolpete, Jul 16, 2012.

  1. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I am a novice bee keeper. I started with a 4 frame Nuc at the end of may. The nuc I got was stuffed with bees and they have not slowed down since. I am working with deep langstroth boxes. At the moment the bees have filled their two brood boxes, are capping the first deep super and drawing out the second. My only worry seems to be that I have too many bees. I have about one or two thousand of them that hang out on and above the landing board and the hive is bursting at the seams. Yet they have not built any swarm cells or anything like that.

    I am still amazed at how gentle they are. I have never work any protective equipment with them and have no stings to show for it. I peek at my bees every day, like a kid at christmas and all I read is bee books. What a great hobby. cappedbrood.jpg
     
  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Welcome Pete! You can never have too many bees. If I understand your post correctly, you are using deeps for both brood boxes and honey supers? If that is the case, I think your okay...further, If I had bees filling up deep honey supers like that, I would add a third. You are going to grow some extra muscles carrying those around. I am fairly new to being a keep myself so I will leave the suggestions for possible splitting in this scenario to the wonderful experts here.

    I thought mine were gentle too until I got my first couple of stings. I wear my gear all the time...just a personal choice for me...I just don't like the three day ordeal of itching and God forbid, a swollen face, ha! Yes, this is a great hobby and I look forward to working with them for years to come. Enjoy and glad you found all of us here...very helpful and friendly folks.

    Dave
     

  3. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Yes, I built all my equipment, so I stuck with one size for everything (Lang deep 10 frame). I have 2 brood boxes, 2 supers, and an empty "lounge" on top. That's all the head room I have in the shed. i have the hive in a garden shed with a slot cut to the outside. I have 3 little kids and I wanted there to be no chance of them knocking the bees over.
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Welcome to the forum Pistolpete :hi:

    Those extra bees hanging out on the front of the hive is natural, it is called bearding. A good sign of a well populated hive. Think of it as too hot in the house so you go sit out on the porch to cool off.
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Welcome to the forum Pistolpete, and welcome to your children too. :hi:
    It sounds like you have everything under control. Considering that you are up in BC, the more reserves you have to overwinter on, the better. But I just wonder if too strong a hive might not be to your disadvantage---the more bees you have, the more they'll need for food during your long cold winter. I dare not give advice because my region has a totally different climatic situation and I have no experience with real over-wintering.
    However, for your consideration, I would throw you one thought: Having one hive only, is like having all your eggs in one basket. If something goes wrong, you'll have to start from scratch. The general recommendation is to work with at least two hives so that one can serve as a backup for the other---particularly if you should have to raise a new queen. Considering the size of your population, it might be a good idea to split your hive and develop a second family, that way you'd also reduce the chances of swarming.
    My real recommendaation is that you contact another local beekeeper, someone who has experience in your neighborhood and pump him/her for advice.
     
  6. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Hives in a shed

    Welcome to the forum. You will get good advice and information from this site.

    For a while, I kept hives in a shed (beehouse). One problem I had related to the shed floor. With the weight of the hives and the beekeeper, the floor flexed and the seal between the hive and the wall slot was not bee-tight. The result was stray bees in the shed. I eventually moved the hives outside and used the shed for equipment storage.

    Enjoy your beekeeping. :thumbsup:
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Welcome to our friendly part of the beekeeping world Pete.
    I was born and raised in Vernon, BC (now living inn NS) in the Okanagan Valley. Spent the last dozen or so years in the Lower Mainland (Burnaby). Where you live in BC will encompass a whole range of different climactic conditions, with the Lower Mainland being among the mildest. This will affect possible differences in how you manage your bees.There are some great clubs if you happen to be in the right area that I might suggest, as well we have a few members in BC here. (you never know, you may be neighbours :wink:) I still know a few keeps out there.
    Efmesch is correct with the suggestion of having more than a single hive, the benefits of having at least two are tremendous.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    welcome aboard...
    I do hope you know that for any number of reasons a hive disposition can change (and often change quite dramatically) so do not let you guard down, do learn to light a smoker and do make a habit of wearing some protective gear. as I have suggest to others.. bees are exactly like keeping some wild thing in a box and Sigfried and Roy's tigers are quite docile most of the time... hopefully you can connect the dots here.

    where are you in BC? we have cousins up in Prince George and I have visited up that way and know that there is a diverse landscape in the Canadian provinces. BC is quite a beautiful place.... as we sometimes say 'a post card picture, no matter which way you look'.
     
  9. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Welcome pistolpete, this is a nice place to learn and share.
    I agree with efmesch and Perry on the second hive, and you learn faster:smile:
     
  10. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I absolutely agree with two hives being better. Money is an issue ( with me being the sole income provider for 5 people). I "inherited" a bunch of gear from an old beek, built my frames and boxes. One nuc is all I could afford. I am in Williams Lake (about two hours south of Prince George). isn't it a bit late in the year to be splitting a hive?
     
  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Ahhh, Williams Lake, ranch country! I really don't know about flows and such in the middle of the province so maybe splitting is questionable. If you were to purchase a mated queen you would probably still be OK. I have an old childhood friend who works for Finning in Williams Lake.
     
  12. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    welcome to the forum pistolpete :wave:

    british columbia, a beautiful place, although i have not been to williams lake, i have been to prince george and have traveled all over bc and love it! my family hails from the northwesst corner of montana, near glacier park on the u.s side. enjoy your bees and enjoy the forum!
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I seem to recall traveling thru Williams Lake... west side of rockies if I recall and a couple of picture pretty small towns with lots of forestry related stuff going on???

    in my travels to BC I did meet up with a beekeeper in Prince George. I seem to recall he 'cellared' bees in the winter time... split fairly radically in the late summer to stay ahead of the mites.
     
  14. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I was planning on splitting in the spring, because plants dry up here in August and then first frost can hit in mid october. I'd rather not have all my eggs in one basket, so I'll ask a couple of local beeks to see if I can split now.
     
  15. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

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  16. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Welcome and enjoy your stay! :)
     
  17. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I checked with a queen supplier about four hours south of here. He said that to ship a single queen would be $20 and $25 for the queen. Also if I start my own queen she would not start laying for close to a month for now, not leaving enough time to build up by frost. I guess I'll split them end of May next year, which should hopefully reduce swarming tendencies.
     
  18. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    Here is where I just got two queens from. Great folks to deal with also. Tom

    "Iowa Queens" marked for $18 each plus $10 shipping, from Ebert Honey Co, LLC adam.ebert@eberthoney.com
     
  19. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    A belated welcome from me.
     
  20. CarrollwoodBees

    CarrollwoodBees New Member

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    Welcome. You'll like this forum. Lots of nice, generously helpful beekeepers here. I especially endorse tecumseh, PerryBee and efmesch from my short experience on this board. My apologies to the other great folks who might feel left out--no slight intended. Overall, everyone tries to be helpful--absolutely no trolls here. ;>