Hi everyone, I'm Sondra

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Sondra, Sep 21, 2017.

  1. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I have a wild bee hive that has been in my backyard for 3 years in a charcoal grill. Roofers thew the hive and it is a mess inside now. How do I get the bees to move into a real hive. We couldn't find the queen so I have a new queen. Help please.

    Sondra
     
  2. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    Welcome aboard....there are several threads you can search for your answers with lots of info..but in the short, do you have bee hives and frames yet? if not buy some from a local person or cheaper by mail order..what is your location?..
    after you get the new wooden hive and frames, take the center plastic out of some of the frames and any comb from the BBQ that has brood or honey can be rubber banded to the frames and then placed into the new hive, once all the comb is in pour in whatever bees you have from the bbq and introduce the queen in her queen box with a marsh mellow for the other bees to chew through to release the queen in a few days..and the bees will take it from there, also this would be a good time to feed sugar syrup to them..
     

  3. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    The difficulty is that you may have two queens. In fact you most likely have two.

    However if you keep your queen in her cage and watch the bees interact with her you can get a clue whether they will kill her as soon as they get in or not. I would tend to handle it like Bob has said with the exception of trying to evaluate the queen situation a little better. If you put the combs of brood and pollen in frames with rubber bands and add as many bees as you can shake, scoop, dump etc into the hive on the combs and the rest of the loose bees begin to march into the new hive you most likely have the old queen in there. If they do not move into the hive readily and want to stay in the old grill, the queen is probably still in there and you can likely get the ones in your new box to accept your new queen by the time they chew their way into her cage.

    One way to tell if the colony has a queen is that they will quickly begin making queen cells within a few days if they do not. They have to have some eggs or very young larvae to successfully make emergency queen cells.

    Until you get the situation sorted out you should put your new queen in her cage in a small temporary hive with a small number of worker bees on a comb with honey and maybe some brood so she can be tended and does not die. If you need her then you can easily combine the "nuc" with the larger colony
     
  4. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    just to add, when I did a split after a swarm, I didnt see any queens, 1 was a maybe but still small, so I put 2 boxed queens, 1 in each hive, the hive that had the maybe queen, didnt let the new queen out of the box, the other hive did...
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Sondra, when I go to work I'm out of pocket for a week or 2. what is the status of your bees? and where are you, climate wise?