Hi Everyone!

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by arkiebee, Jan 22, 2015.

  1. arkiebee

    arkiebee New Member

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    I haven't posted in quite a while. Just wondering how everyone is doing? I have looked through the posts and don't see some of the usual members, hope everyone is ok. I have 9 hives that are still going last warm spell we had here in Arkansas. At least I saw hive activity, but I am worried about a couple of them - not as much activity as the others. Think the first "warm" day, I may put some sugar water on them and a pollen patty. I left them with the hive bodies plus a super full of honey last fall. Think I will split at least 4 - 5 of them this spring. -

    I have never treated for varroa, but the other beekeepers in the area have. I want to use something that is not so hard on the bees - is there more of a natural treatment you recommend? I am still trying to get in touch with our state inspector to see what he recommends. I had a good honey crop last year, but I just don't want to lose my bees.

    Since I haven't been on the forum in a while, I have noticed a lot of ads that keep coming up, is it just me or is this part of the forum now? This is a wonderful resource for beekeepers, glad to know it looks like it has really grown over the past few years.

    Keep warm
    Arkiebee
     
  2. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    I use oxalic acid vapor. Never had a problem with it, it's a natural component of honey.
     

  3. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    What camero7 said, easy to use with a vaporize and gets rid of the mites.

    ‚ÄčKen
     
  4. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

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    I know I should do what camero7 and kebee said... and you should, too. I am still that cheap guy that has to learn everything the hard way. The way I should look at it is: the cost of losing one good hive is more than the cost of getting started with a vaporizer.

    I am still messing around with powdered sugar and screened BBs in May;
    and green plastic drone foundation through the summer (when those drone frames have occupants, they spend a couple days in the freezer when Mz Ibeelearning ain't looking).
     
  5. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Hiya! I don't treat at all. All seems to be happy so far.
     
  6. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Welcome back.

    A few years ago, I lost all my hobby hives to pyrethroid resistant varroa I don't want to go there again.

    There is a dilema ..... treat or no treat. With a no treat, it will be take the losses and hope to develop a strain of resistant bees. Since there are other beeks in my area and I use open mating, I am opting to treat. :???:
     
  7. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I suppose my bees could be developing resistance. I use my own swarms to repopulate winter losses and add to my numbers. Swarm catches other places I suppose help with my genetic diversity. I am in my hives enough to notice an absence of mites and/or low count anyway. The top bar hive seem to be doing the best of in this department.