Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I'm a newbie from Golden, Colorado. Have tried unsuccessfully in the past a few times to have bees but decided to give it another go. We'll see how they do over the winter. Am looking for some advice on my current situation which I'll post in the Newbee forum. Great to be here.

Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Hi. I'm a newbie from Golden, Colorado. Have tried unsuccessfully in the past a few times to have bees but decided to give it another go. We'll see how they do over the winter. Am looking for some advice on my current situation which I'll post in the Newbee forum. Great to be here.

Laura
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
HELLO: I just returned this evening from a 2 Day seminar in Cabool, Missouri covering/concerning, "Natural Beekeeping In Horizontal Hives". These hives are more attuned to the bees life in the wild than are the vertical hives. We learned that they bees are much calmer, maybe because even with the top off the hive, most of the bees are still under cover as the frames can be pulled out one at a time, and without having to lift 2, 3, or 4 supers off of your 2 brood boxes. These hives are larger, yes, however, once the setting of the hive, the heaviest lifting is a frame full of honey. With the vertical hives you're lifting maybe a 20 to 60 lb box after box to get down to check the brood area. Check it out at - horizontalhive.com - as it is truly amazing! This 2 day seminar was well worth the time, the money, and my drive from Indiana, a 1,100 mile trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
857 Posts
HELLO: I just returned this evening from a 2 Day seminar in Cabool, Missouri covering/concerning, "Natural Beekeeping In Horizontal Hives". These hives are more attuned to the bees life in the wild than are the vertical hives. We learned that they bees are much calmer, maybe because even with the top off the hive, most of the bees are still under cover as the frames can be pulled out one at a time, and without having to lift 2, 3, or 4 supers off of your 2 brood boxes. These hives are larger, yes, however, once the setting of the hive, the heaviest lifting is a frame full of honey. With the vertical hives you're lifting maybe a 20 to 60 lb box after box to get down to check the brood area. Check it out at - horizontalhive.com - as it is truly amazing! This 2 day seminar was well worth the time, the money, and my drive from Indiana, a 1,100 mile trip.
you sound like a spammer, your response has nothing todo with the ops statement....

to the original op, give some more details on your setup and what went wrong in the past...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Well, what I sound like and what I AM are two very different things. I simply replied to "Laura" with some information on a type of hive that she probably did not know about.
NOW, if YOU think I am a spammer, I think YOU do not want people to recognize that there ARE other types of hives available. I did not reply to her posting on the Forum - I posted back to her Intro text ONLY!
I hope you have a wonderful day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
857 Posts
Well, what I sound like and what I AM are two very different things. I simply replied to "Laura" with some information on a type of hive that she probably did not know about.
NOW, if YOU think I am a spammer, I think YOU do not want people to recognize that there ARE other types of hives available. I did not reply to her posting on the Forum - I posted back to her Intro text ONLY!
I hope you have a wonderful day!
I just call em as I see em...with 2 posts your pushing something awful hard that really has no relativity to original ops post...for someone new it seems a bit suspicious...
also, why do you post a blank reply then one with text in it?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,518 Posts
I wouldn't worry about it at this point. We have almost no posts. and the horizontal hives are becoming popular with older beekeepers where lifting boxes on and off of a 10 frame is an issue. I haven't tried one yet, but I have the stand to pull it off and the wood and saws to build one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
857 Posts
I wouldn't worry about it at this point. We have almost no posts. and the horizontal hives are becoming popular with older beekeepers where lifting boxes on and off of a 10 frame is an issue. I haven't tried one yet, but I have the stand to pull it off and the wood and saws to build one.
I have no issue with what type of hive people use, but I just hate the spammers that think they are so slick when spamming to push a product...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,518 Posts
he sounds like he's excited fresh from a lot of workshops and sharing, and that's ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
HELLO: I just returned this evening from a 2 Day seminar in Cabool, Missouri covering/concerning, "Natural Beekeeping In Horizontal Hives". These hives are more attuned to the bees life in the wild than are the vertical hives. We learned that they bees are much calmer, maybe because even with the top off the hive, most of the bees are still under cover as the frames can be pulled out one at a time, and without having to lift 2, 3, or 4 supers off of your 2 brood boxes. These hives are larger, yes, however, once the setting of the hive, the heaviest lifting is a frame full of honey. With the vertical hives you're lifting maybe a 20 to 60 lb box after box to get down to check the brood area. Check it out at - horizontalhive.com - as it is truly amazing! This 2 day seminar was well worth the time, the money, and my drive from Indiana, a 1,100 mile trip.
Was this course given by Dr. Leo Sharashkin? He has a great website on horizontal hives. I built a couple of them this spring during the Covid lockdown, so this is my first year i've used them. I have the girls all put to bed for the winter so we'll see they are in the spring. I have been excited about the new type of hive because it offers a lot of benefits as your stated....
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,518 Posts
Welcome @Larry Redhage

I have trouble getting small hives in 10 frame equipment thru the winter, if they are a single box. are you using medium or deep frames in your boxes? I put my smaller hives in 5 frame nucs and stack them, deep on the bottom, it gives them better protection from robbing I think.

Part of that may be because I am in Texas, and we alternate between freezes and foragers looking for nectar when all the plants have frozen. Those foragers then attempt robbery on the smaller hives.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top