High Filtration " Honey "

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Murrell, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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  2. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    Murrell, glad to see you posting. How's the recovery going?

    Walt
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Glad to see you back. Hope this is a sign of better times.
     
  4. BRASWELL

    BRASWELL New Member

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    So why are selling our honey so cheap. Are we setting our price based on grocery store chain prices. If our honey is so great why is it so cheap. RB
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    as far as I know (from some small experience with Sue Bee long ago) all the bottlers use diatom filters to remove everything from the honey. this extends shelf life by limiting crystalization.

    I have long held that thinking the packers have the same interest or concerns as producers is flawed thinking with the producer ALWAYS coming out with the short end of the stick. Organizations which pretend to represent packers and producers almost invariable are using the producers for stage props to get what the packers want (typically from some government).
     
  6. Jacobs

    Jacobs New Member

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    Braswell, I'm not sure what you consider cheap. Around here, most people I know get around $5.00/pound ($7.50/pint jar). Most folks have no problem selling their local honey to buyers who either are willing to buy local and buy less at higher prices or who just appreciate the flavor difference between the highly processed/filtered supermarket honey and raw local honey.

    At some point you will price yourself out of the market. If the price is too far above the perceived value, folks will substitute cheaper honey of lower quality or even go with other sweeteners like sugar or corn syrup. Buy a suit off the rack or have one tailor made?
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    :goodpost:

    must be a banner day another good post.

    the market for folks who buy off the shelf over processed honey is not the same as someone who buys 'real honey' (unfiltered and unheated just like god meant it to be).
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Thanks for posting that Murrell, VERY interesting read!
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A local flea market here has processed honey for 5.00 for a pint. They also have local, raw honey, marked as such, sitting next to it at 8.00 for a pint. The local sells more than the processed.
     
  10. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Was reading one of the articles that Bee News puts on the forum that was talking about urban beekeeping in NYC. They are getting $17.95/lb. for their raw honey.

    This gets me to thinking about starting a new thread. How much do you sell your honey for, and what type of venue.
     
  11. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Nevermind, that thread was already started under products of the hive.
     
  12. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Murrell, glad your back, it takes more than a little sickness to kill us hillbillies. :mrgreen: When selling honey at the farmers market, customers ask,(those that don't know me) if local honey where do you live and how do you filter your honey? I answer: 2 miles south of here and i don't filter my honey, i strain it once and bottle it. I'm always sold out by first of the year. :thumbsup: Jack