Hive 40' off the ground

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by RE Jones, Feb 20, 2012.

  1. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I had a friend of mine come by today. He know that I have bees.
    He asked if I wanted some more and of course, I said yes.
    Went about 5 miles from my house and pulled up in this guys yard.
    This hive has been in the oak tree for three years. It's about 40' up on a 6" diameter limb.
    It is completely across the 6" limb, I counted 5 combs hanging down about 16"-18". It was covered in bees. They have started building comb off of the top of the big ones. I did not get any pictures as they were so far up. And there is no way I am gonna hang off a 50' ladder to get these bees!!
    Any body got a bucket truck I can borrow?
    Robert
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Any friends in the fire department? :mrgreen:
    Ask 'em if they need to run a practice drill. ;)
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Your local tv news may supply the bucket truck just for the story.
     
  4. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm confused by what you wrote. Are the bees in the branch or have they built comb on the outside of the branch? Three years? Is it really that mild there that they could last that long relatively exposed? You call this an oak. Is that what I know as a "live oak"? They have leaves all year around, don't they?

    Good luck. Don't get hurt. Hope they aren't Africanized.
     
  5. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Mark, the bees are on the outside of the limb, not inside. This is an oak tree that will shed it leaves during the winter. Most of the oaks down here drop their leaves during a winter. That's why my yard is nothing but oak leaves right now.
    According to the owner of the property, he has been watching them for at least three years.
    I have asked this question before. How do these bees stay alive when they are exposed to the elements? This is not the first one that I have seen like this.
    As far as them being AHB, my money would be on them not being. He drives his tractor under this tree and the exhaust on it goes straight up and he says they have never attacked him. Secondly the comb is built like a European honeybee comb.
    As far as he is concerned, he is happy to leave them there. He did say I could have them if I could get them down. I'm thinking on several different approaches.
    Robert
     
  6. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    ??? Would an external colony swarm? If so, it might be a good place for a swarm trap...that would be some interesting genes to put in the bee yard.
     
  7. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If I do not get the hive, I did tell him to let me know if they did swarm. I'm thinking that they will as crowded as the hive seems to be. Maybe I do need to set up a swarm trap just in case.
    I really would like to get some of these, since they have been out in the open for three years.
    Robert
     
  8. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the reply Robert. I'd leave them alone and collect swarms. Set up a cpl of swarm traps nearby. It would be interesting to see how long this colony lasts out in the open.

    If you could get close enuf to see details, some photos would be nice, I bet you would find that the bees have built their comb in a manner which shelters them well.

    Keep us Posted.