Hive beetles

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by LtlWilli, Jun 19, 2011.

  1. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    I have an outbreak of hive beetles in a nuc hive. I do not plan to harvest honey from this one, so what can I treat with or do for control? This morning , I picked off a couple a dozen within one box of trays. Their numbers are growing, I'm sure , and my efforts so far are no more than a stopgap...Any suggestions?

    LtlWilli
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Get them out of the shade....
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    as iddee said get them in full sun. If the nuc is strong enough they should be able to take care of the problem. Are you sure they are small hive beetle there is also a sap beetle that looks just like a shb but just a little bit smaller. The sap beetle i have been told will not harm the hive
     
  4. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    There is also a wax beetle, slightly smaller than the SHB. Full sun,, beetle traps, oil tray under screened bottom board and Checkmite + when the hive is about to die anyway with larva infesting the comb.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    freeze infested frames and feed the nucs.
     
  6. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    I guess I'll have to go with traps and oil because the mini-hive I have only covers 4 frames just yet. It's nice to also know that it might be another type beetle. I need to make a comparison...Oh , and continue to feed.
    LtlWilli
     
  7. Flyman

    Flyman New Member

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    LtlWilli, I'm just down the road from you in College Mound. Although other beetles certainly exist, I've only seen small hive beetle in our part of the world (at least in the hives). Best offense is strong hives and full sun. I know a nuc is hardly a large hive, but if they're not in full sun your fighting a loosing battle to begin with. As Tech said, feed them. Keep them brooded up and new bees hatching to combat the beetles.

    The best trap I've seen for large infestations is a West bottom trap. Won't fit in a nuc though. I think I would invest in several beetle blasters or similar, at least four, and put them in the corners.

    You didn't say if you see SHB larvae that have hatched. This is really on the downhill side. Only defense here is to freeze the infested frame and sacrifice any bee larvae/eggs that may be on it. SHB larvae will slime a frame in 3 days so keep a close watch. The ultimate end will probably be that the bees will abscond, so watch for what would look like a swarm near the hive. If this happens, just put them in another box and let them start over (far from the original if possible).

    Another good defense (this one is for the future) is a hygenic queen, something with a minimum of Minnesota Hygenic or VSH genetics.

    Hope this helps.
     
  8. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    The nuc was getting 6 hours of sun, but I can move it tommorow out into the real light...I saw only one size of beetle. All about as big as a very small ladybug.
    They are still building, so I'll hope for the best....Thanks
    LtlWilli
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    6 hours of sun for the bees means 8 hours of shade for the SHB. They will love you for that.
     
  10. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    my feral bees seem to be able to keep them at bay or just kill them off...when my carny hive had them it was a big enuff hive that they kept them at bay...but the feral hive...a foot and a half away...under the same shade tree on the same stand...would not let them stay...there were none in there and i looked for them...they had a few earlier in the year but then they were gone...almost to the day after the feral queen died...there were quite a few...now that the new feral queen is laying eggs again...the SHB are gone again...i asked this question before and nobody knew why...just told me to keep the feral line going...they are smaller bees...and i wonder how much african they have in them...nice as pie but toss a bug near the entrance and look out...the carnys send out a small team to kill the bug and toss it over the side...the ferals send out a death squad of about 50 and ball it till it dont move...then (shudder) take it inside the hive...what they doing taking it INSIDE (gasp...banjo music ensues)
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    2kooldad writes:
    the ferals send out a death squad of about 50 and ball it till it dont move...then (shudder) take it inside the hive...what they doing taking it INSIDE (gasp...banjo music ensues)

    tecumseh:
    as they say in east Texas when you hear the sound of banjo's it is best to get yourself on home.

    largely I find bees that propolize heavily also are the best at not tolerating the small hive beetles. I find it curious (in an ah ha kind of way) that flyman has notice some connection between hygenic behavior and intolerance to the small hive beetle.. interesting.