hive bodies

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by daver110, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. daver110

    daver110 New Member

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    does anyone have any experience with using eastern red ceader for hive bodies? I wonder about their effect on mites, beatles, and bees.
    dave
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    From my general knowledge of Juniper, or red cedar, it repels insects. Bees are insects. Therefore, I have never put it in any of my hives.
    Others may have actual experience with it, I haven't.
     

  3. SmithN

    SmithN New Member

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    I have not used cedar hive bodies,
    but the past 2 years I have used cedar shavings (used for dog bedding)
    under and around my hives in hopes of hindering the pupating of Small hive beetle larvae.
    My bees are still in the hives and I 'm not sure it's doing much hindering of the larvae.
     
  4. charmd2

    charmd2 New Member

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    I bought cedar bottom boards and still have bees and mites. Around here I get several swarm calls a year from bees that hang on cedar trees to rest. No negative or positive differences noted to my other hives.
     
  5. Davisbees

    Davisbees New Member

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    I dont have any cedar hive bodies but I did cut a bee tree several years ago that was in a hollow cedar tree and they were doing just fine. From the color of the comb I would say they had been in there three or four years.
     
  6. daver110

    daver110 New Member

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    wow thanks for all the reply's. I think i won't pass up an opportunity to make up red ceader hive boxes.
     
  7. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    In my time I have cut down a number of Eastern red cedars, I don't ever
    recall a hollow one, that's were the red hard wood is.

    Of course they are home to lot's of ticks !

    Course I don't know much, I know, too the back of the bus !

    Murrell
     
  8. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    Cedar is great for lasting a long time and repelling insects that consume or bore into wood. There are two different kinds of cedar, aromatic cedar and normal cedar. Apart from insects that eat or bore into wood normal cedar does not seem to have any other effect for the hive... apart from being a lightweight long-lasting product that is water resistant on it's own. Since it isn't prone to rot, cedar hive bodies should last at least twice as long as standard white or yellow pine (Hence the reason that decks are often made from Cedar).

    Beware of aromatic cedar however. Although it might keep the moths away, it might also drive the bees away. A person that wanted to test the effects of this could get those cedar closet hangers and place some above the inside cover and/or below a screened bottom board to test it's effect on the bees (cedar hangers are almost always made with aromatic cedar to keep moths away from your clothes).

    Aromatic cedar is very expensive however, so if you're finding cheap cedar somewhere, odds are it's not aromatic. I want to say that aromatic cedar only grows in the western US, but for the life of me I can't honestly remember which one grows on which side of the country, so don't take my word on that one.
     
  9. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    Eastern red cedar is longer lasting than some woods but not the greatest.

    A nice 8 in. Eastern red cedar, looks like a nice fence post, after a few years the white, outside will rot fairly quickly under ground.

    When you pull the post, below ground you will have a diameter of 2-3 in of hard red wood, which will snap off quickly when a cow scraths against it.

    Been there and done that, many times !

    I know go to the back of the bus !

    Murrell
     
  10. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    I have alot of cedar trees on my property and was also wondering if they could be turned into hives. Has anyone here ever cut their own cedar to use this way, or has the wood been store bought? The hives I have are standard hives and they have cedar bottoms. I assumed they were made with this kind of wood because of the location close to the ground and it's durability against the elements.