Hive Body hand hold jig for table saw.

Discussion in 'Building plans, blueprints, and finished projects' started by Yankee11, Dec 18, 2012.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I decided to start a new thread and give it a title easy to find instead of it being buried in a different thread.

    I will show pictures and explain as best I can then we can discuss if any questions.

    This is the handles this jig makes.


    2012-12-18_19-03-08_220.jpg


    Pictures of jig.

    2012-12-18_18-50-44_248.jpg 2012-12-18_18-51-03_357.jpg 2012-12-18_18-51-56_957.jpg 2012-12-18_18-52-31_640.jpg 2012-12-18_18-52-53_64.jpg 2012-12-18_19-03-50_181.jpg 2012-12-18_18-51-25_433.jpg 2012-12-18_18-55-38_780.jpg




    Here some of the details.

    I took a piece of plywood and cut a scare hole in it to sit down over the saw blade. Then I made the 2 ramps.
    These are cut at 20 degrees. Then I made the second plate with a hole in it for the blade to come up through.
    I fastened all this together and I us C-Clamps to attach the jig to the table saw.

    Here is the trick.

    I clamp the hive body board and I start with my table saw blade at 20 degrees angle (or close) then I crank the saw blade just til it touches the board (starting point). Next I crank blade 1 revolution into the board. Then I sweep my blade angle toward 0 degrees and then back. Then I turn blade crank one more turn and repeat. ( sweep blade towards 0 degrees and back to 20) Then a third crank on the blade and one more sweep to ) and back to 20 and back and your done. Crank saw blade down, turn off saw and clamp another board to jig and repeat.

    With the board being at a 20 degree angle and you starting the saw blade at a 20 degree angle, makes the top of the handle. The sweep digs out the bottom of the handle. Going into the board one turn at a time
    keeps you form taking out to much material at one time.

    Really not even hard on the blade or saw. I use a 10 inch blade.

    3 cranks on saw blade seams to be a deep enough handle with my saw. You can adjust your depth to suit you.

    Hope this makes since. If not please ask questions.

    I hope this helps. It's really easy and quick once you do the first few.
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I wonder how well this would work with dado blades?

    They may not be tall enough to make it through the fixture and into the hive body. Could use two blades stacked together with a washer between them.

    Just thinking out loud!
     

  3. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I tried dado blades with the board laying flat in one of my previous trials and it did not work. Made a real funny looking handle.
    I did not try with the board angled. BUT, the dado blade is only 8 inches so it wouldn't be as wide of a handle. I may try it with board angled though and see what it looks like.

    The single blade really did it easy as long as you don't go more than one turn into the board each time. If you go deeper than that its to much material to remove at ounce.
     
  4. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    I'm not really sure I want to side load the arbor on my saw and a $70 Freud blade.... If the arbor had tapered roller bearings I wouldn't be so worried about it but a plain roller bearing doesn't take side loads very well at all. I'm still leaning towards getting an arbor extension for a router and a router bit to cut hand-holds.
     
  5. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Doesn't seem to put much of load on saw. Blade is only going in the board about 1/8 of and inch each pass. # passes puts the handle about a half in deep into the wood. Not much material being removed each pass. If you go much deeper it starts to load up.

    Not using a 70 dollar blade. Maybe 30 dollar DeWalt from Lowes.
     
  6. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    Thanks for the pictures and solutions for a ubiquitous challenge Yankee :)
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Beautiful. Now you make me wish that I had such a fancy woodworking setup of my own.
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Saw blades ore not designed to cut from the side so the depth of side plow is about equivalent to the height of the set angle on top of the teeth. In order to cut with the side of a blade the face needs to be ground 5* back the top 12* down form the leading edge and the cutting side 8* into the blade center and a hook angle of about 7*
     
  9. tommyt

    tommyt New Member

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    Thats a nice set up
    I saw one it,The guy made the jig slide, he then
    just set it in on the lean side and pushed the sled to the deep end

    Thanks for sharing it
     
  10. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Funny thing is Tommy, I saw the same video.

    That's what I was trying to do but I could not get it to work. I was trying to move that sled into
    the blade and it would barely go. That's when I decided to attach the sled then sweep the blade.
     
  11. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    I am with DLMKA, your saw spindle isn't designed for a side-load and you are likely to destroy the bearings after much use.

    For my hand-holds, I simply cut a small window in a piece of scrap plywood, then used this as a router guide for a 1/2" diameter chamfered corner bit (a ball end bit would work well too).

    [​IMG]

    Another advantage is that it is easy to relocate the hand hold up or down a bit to dodge a knot-hole in the wood.
     
  12. tefer2

    tefer2 New Member

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    pturley, you must have some really skinny fingers.
     
  13. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    IMG_0606.jpg I just use straight plunge cuts with the dado blade set at the widest. drawback is there is no water drain slant at the bottom.

    As another poster noted regular blades or dados just simply are not set cut laterally. Aside from the undesign load on bearings there is danger of fatigue breaking the hub out of the blade at the rim of the collars if you do many cuts. You could have a nasty frisby on the loose!
     
  14. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I do exactly what Frank (Crofter) does. The corners or something else goes long before the no slope handle cuts become a problem.

    Plus, I do exactly what Frank does for joints (rabbet) and screws. You folks with your finger joints make me feel jealous.
     
  15. Minz

    Minz Member

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    This is what I use
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaWRjpJ5f0w
    Google the Wimpy Hogan hand hold cutting jig. That way you can ‘plunge the saw’ rather than place lateral force on the bearing. I was even looking around for a table saw blade with some ‘hooker’ teeth (like my bandsaw blades). No such use.
    Generally build my boxes then cut them. I almost always eat a lot of dust because it is up too high. Send wimpy an email he is very responsive. I found him on beesource and he sent all kinds of emails. Good man, good beek.
     
  16. tommyt

    tommyt New Member

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    Wimpy Hogan

    Very Nice guy
    IMHO
     
  17. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Minz,

    I was actually headed that direction. Does it work well. And is it quick.
     
  18. Minz

    Minz Member

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    Yank, I am assuming it is a question, if not disregard.
    It is messy (I literally eat dust but I assemble my boxes then cut). Mostly because of my working height off the saw.
    It is rough but I hit it with a sander and they look professional.
    I am not as fast as his video. I burned up my good skil saw on an oak table and could not peel my cheap fingers off of my wallet to get a nice one so you get what you pay for.
    http://i1141.photobucket.com/albums/n599/6minz/stand2.jpg
    The top deep on the left is a wimpy, The bottom of the next over (D6) is a wimpy, some of them are ¾ dato’s some are factory and used. Note do not do a wimpy on the castles front and back since the dato cuts into the hand hold. Oops, second down castle has a wimpy (with the beard). I am nothing if not inconsistent.
     
  19. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Minz,
    I love that shrubbery that shields your hives. It gives them a good environment for work--not to mention the work of the beekeeper. :thumbsup:
     
  20. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    It is two passes with a router, a bit less than 5/8" top to bottom (didn't measure). I just needed the tips of my fingers to get purchase. The slots are located about palm width from the top edge of the boxes.