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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a question. I have 2 hives, in one hive, the bees are working like crazy ,100's going in and out in 1 minute literally. In the other hive, hundreds of bees are sitting out on the front porch of the hive taking it easy with litterally 15-20 bees a minute flying in and out. I put the extra super on and it looks like it is slam full of bees. could they need another super only after 2 weeks. the bees are not sitting out on the first hive.
 

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They could need another one in 1 week if the first one is full. I have seen them fill a 10 frame deep in 10 days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow, that is fast. The gals have consumed almost 1/2 a gallon TODAY!!!! Filled it up this morning around 7:30am and by 5:30pm it was about gone....Can believe they drink that fast. Both hives. Especially the one where there was not much activity. Wonder if they are just trying to live off the sugar water....?
 

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Are these new hives on foundation or established hives? sounds like you have a flow going on and i don't understand why your still feeding. :confused: Jack
 

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Yes, they are on foundation, brand new hive. I'm a new beekeeper so I am learning what to do and when. They sure are drinking the sugar water.
 

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although good insurance and a definite plus to keep a new hive growing (most especially if you are starting from frames and foundation) at some point you need to curtail the sugar water. if there is a lot coming in you risk the hazard of helping the hive back fill the brood nest which at the proper time of year will almost automatically lead to swarming.

if you have bees hanging out on the front porch then I would consider not only adding extra supers but also some ventilation at the top and/or the middle of the stack.

bees hanging out on the front porch in the most extreme case is called bearding and is a good sign of a hive's intention of swarming.
 

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I've got a similar situation. I've also read that when starting a new hive w/ foundation, you should continue feeding until the foundation is all drawn out. Certainly you don't need to feed until they're ALL completely drawn, do you? I've got at least 6+ undrawn frames in each one of my hives (2 deeps at this point), but they're still taking +/- 1 gallon of syrup a week. There are several frames packed with nectar (or syrup) in the bottom box of each hive. Of course there's a flow on, and I would truly love to stop feeding, but should I continue until they're a little closer to fully drawn?

Thanks
 

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the idea is to feed (think dribble and not pour) until a hive has the resources to make it thru any adverse weather or season.

once you have 'a box' of bees and the box has weight then do precisely as Iddee suggest.
 

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Quick question...
My lower hive bodies are pretty much full (of bees, brood, nectar, pollen). The empties are mostly all located in the top hive body. Are you suggesting I mix the undrawn foundation on top with frames from below? I never really thought about that; maybe it seemed like too drastic of a move.

I have moved some frames a spot or two closer to center in the lower hive bodies before. Should I just continue that kind of manipulation in the top body as they continue to fill it out?

Btw, I'm using inverted 1 gal. jar feeders on top of the hives, so they have been feeding at a "dribble" rate. It seems like they've worked wonderfully so far- and free!

-Dan
 

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Don't make a simple thing complicated. Just move the full frames to the outside, empty frames inside. Same box or switch boxes, doesn't matter. The object is to make the empty frame become a hole in their nest. They don't like holes, and fill them quickly.
 

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to add some additional information to Iddee's 'full frames'... good frame to move to the outside of the nest are 1) solid frames of capped honey and 2) any frame that is almost entirely composed of pollen. either of these may impede the expansion of the brood nest outwards.

the bees have a tendency to not want to uncap honey and the frames of pollen are eventually utilized but the girls don't care so much about moving pollen like they will uncapped honey.

if you are starting from foundation one frame of comb place into the center of the upper box can act to lure them upwards. personally I like to see the bottom box as wall to wall bees before I encourage any brood expansion upward.
 
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