Hive Location

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by kemptville, Mar 10, 2012.

  1. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    Morning All!

    As some of you know, I will be starting in this hobby come Spring and I'm curious about the placement of my two hives in proximity of corn fields that surround my property. I have read that corn is not a great source of food for the bees and I'm concerned about that. There are no other locations I can put my hives but next to a corn field in any direction on our property - will this pose a problem for the bees? Will the bees stick to collecting from the corn fields or will they venture further away i.e. in the forest beyond or the greenhouses further down the road?
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    in most commercial agricultural setting there is a lot of unplanted area on the edges of he fields. in places that are highly commercial and where weed killing agents have been used I would avoid these 1) there will be almost nothing that does bloom and 2) all the residue you can collected both in any flowers and in the water in these places likely means the hive will not flourish.

    ps... the only situation I know of that is worst than a corn field for bees is a solid stand of conifer timber. nothing in the trees for a bee and the evergreens shade out anything below that might bloom.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 3, 2012

  3. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    I agree with tec, especially about the conifer timber.

    South Alabama over the last 40 years has been raped by the paper companies (as other areas have been). Vast hardwood stands of timber have been clear cut, many of the old giants simply pushed up to be burned or rot because they were "too big" to be processed. :( In their places were planted "plantation pines", mostly fast growing weak hybrid pine trees. Where you use to be able to walk beneath the oaks and elms and poplars and kick the leaves back and find lots of *moisture* and all kinds of soil life you now kick back dry pine needles to find hard, dusty ground with little soil life. Understory plants are few beneath the pine canopies as tec mentioned. Many people who actively "farm" these plantations burn off the ground beneath the trees to discourage native plants from becoming established. As a matter of fact, prior to planting the pine seedlings it is getting to be a common practice to spray the clear-cut land with a herbicide to kill any hardwood saplings that might be trying to sprout.

    Lots of wildlife habitat has been loss...and many bee trees. Plantation pine stands down here are almost a type of desert. One small silver lining are the deer hunters who will go in to some areas and plant wildlife areas..grains a lot of times, but also clovers, peas, and the like.

    As of lately, the news on corn hasn't been good.

    Ed
     
  4. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    kemptville:

    Don't be too discouraged if the only place to have to place them is next to a corn field. Your bees will fly out to a radius of 4-5 km. to find forage. If there are any fencerows, or unplanted fields with clover and wildflowers, they'll find it.
    This may be a good opportunity to plant some bee friendly plants and flowers around your place. Don't dig up the dandelions or mow the clover too closely in your yard. Also, make sure they have an uncontaminated water source-a dripping outdoor faucet is a good place.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Ed, my land in southern Ms. bordered hundreds, maybe thousands of acres of International Paper pines. The whole forest floor was covered with gallberries for miles. It was the clearest, best, and most honey I have ever gotten from my hives. I could extract a deep, put it back on the hive, and extract it again in 10 days during the bloom.
     
  6. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    Nope, not here, Iddee. I went to look it up and found a map showing the "large" gallberry range...my county is north of it's range. I know that the maps don't always show what is what, but there's nothing like what you mention being in south Ms.....wish it was.

    http://www.pollenlibrary.com/map.aspx?map=Ilex-coriacea.png

    Ed
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I've still got half a pound of clover seed
    To scatter. Texas cattle range and
    Bermudagrass lawns don't offer much
    Forage either. My lots are heavily
    Planted.
    Gypsi
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    well actually Gypsi Texas has a great variety of stuff that blooms.... most of which is rarely noticed by anyone besides a bee keeper.

    most of the time a very much overlooked or unknown quality is the ph of the soil itself. to the uninformed it might seem unimportant if the soil under your feet varies in ph by .5 on the acid/basic scale. this .5 does however very much matter to the kind of plants that grow there and whether they produce lots or sufficient nectar for a hive of honeybees.
     
  9. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    Another question I have is whether placing my hives 100 paces from a small-scale gravel quarry will pose an issue to my bees in terms of dust, blowing sand, etc?
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    if it was me I would definitely give the spot a try. I myself like such spots since they typically are well drained, have good all season access and traffic and usage is pretty much at some minimum.

    the first think I do look for here is good water available during the entire season.
     
  11. ojaicir

    ojaicir New Member

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    Thanks pollen map is great.

    Am I correct in assuming that a high allergy alert is good for the Bees?
     
  12. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    How well can hives do in a woodlot as opposed to the edge of a field? As it stands now, the only location I can put my two hives is on a woodlot of 25 acres. The lot isn't dense bush and there are open areas here and there. Curious if this would have an impact on the bees?
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Bees have been in woodlots for a million years. If you don't have SHB you should be fine.
     
  14. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    On observant of where I had placed my beestand I found it to be in the shade way to much, so today moved it to where I was going to put it in the first place, around 2 1/2 ft from the fence line. My wife said that the people next door may get stung by them, not when they are enter and leaving the other way. Besides they having gotting the place clean up yet to move in and bees will be there before they do. Hope to put some pictures up when I get my bees, so you can see the stand and bee hives.

    kebee
     
  15. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    kebee,
    about placement. be careful and considerate and responsible about your neighbors whether your bees were there before the neighbors, not all folks care for honey bees, and they are indiscriminate about stinging. let's say for example your neighbor has a pool on his property......the first thing you would want to do before placing bees, is to make sure there is a fresh water source they find first, before they find his pool, or stinging will occur.
     
  16. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I say put them where you can and see what happens. Remember bees forage a pretty big area. My only advise is the closer to the grocery story they live the better your chances of a bigger honey crop.:thumbsup:
     
  17. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    They do not have a pool, but I do, I am planning on putting a tub of water close by with floating sticks so they can have all the water they want, to keep them out of the pool.

    kebee
     
  18. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    riverrat,
    i don't have to worry too much about this, my bees are kept in a rural area of cornfields, woods and lots of other forage, and a nearby river. but, once inawhile i bring a nuc home to the city.......my long time neighbor has a big pool in his yard. his granddaughter got stung on the nose, running around like her pants were on fire....so grandpa comes over to my house with alot of non disney language about my bees, (how does he know it was my bee?! they don't have tags on their ears), and some mention of other things, including 'law suit' and 'insurance'.......:grin:

    great metaphor and advice on the grocery store!
     
  19. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    lol lol, and lol!!!
    i was replying to riverrats post and kebee you jumped in here before my reply to riverrat, now i am really laughing about the pool thing! :lol:
    had to edit this 3 dang times laughing so hard.....
    ok, 4 times...
     
  20. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Kebee, hate to burst your bubble, but they prefer chlorinated water to plain tap water. :shock: