Hive observation

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by crazy8days, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I checked my 2 hives I have on a friends property today. Both hives are new this year. Both are into the second deep. Both have good population of bees. 1st hive I noticed very little flying in and out. As I checked the top deep it was mostly capped honey. Bottom deep I found the queen and no brood and no drones. Second hive very little stored honey. Found the queen and as the first hive. No brood, no drones. Both hives are full of bees! The hive with little stores I started to feed heavy syrup. Is this normal for this time pf year??
     
  2. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    That pretty much describes my hives, except one still has some drones kicking around. Hopefully your light hive will store lots of syrup in the next couple of weeks.
     

  3. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Mine as well. The boys are being pushed out and very few left in mine.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Why no brood? Is it because the queens shut down early? I still have brood on the go in most of my hives up here.
     
  5. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Perry the brood no brood is reliant on fall flow. If one is in an area with little or no fall flow, either pollen or nector. Or if the flow is diminished by drought, bad wheather and few flying days or plants under attack from other dieases, fungase or pests.
    Here in the Okanagan the first frost is a month away still even 6 weeks but the last of the brood is hatching out and the populations have diminished due to summer bees dying off. In oher words they are looking good for winter.

    I have to go look at a new bekeepers hive on thursday. He is cocerned when on his last inspection he could not se ant brood or eggs. Is it queenless? I will see on thursday. I would not be supprised if it is not.


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  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    good post Apisbees.... I will add to his comment that 'the kind of queen' you have in the box will also direct effect if you do or do not see brood at this time of year. if I remember correctly carnis queens are fairly well know to halt brood rearing when a flow totally stops <for some reason I seem to recall that the lag between the end of flow and the halting of brood production takes about 3 days.
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    crazy~
    "Is this normal for this time pf year??"

    yes crazy, you have carnis? and i will chime in with what apis and tecumseh said, and especially your queen:
    apis~
    "the brood no brood is reliant on fall flow. If one is in an area with little or no fall flow, either pollen or nector. Or if the flow is diminished by drought, bad wheather and few flying days or plants under attack from other dieases, fungase or pests......" "but the last of the brood is hatching out and the populations have diminished due to summer bees dying off. In oher words they are looking good for winter."

    tecumseh~
    "'the kind of queen' you have in the box will also direct effect if you do or do not see brood at this time of year. if I remember correctly carnis queens are fairly well know to halt brood rearing when a flow totally stops <"

    and feed as you are doing. :grin: