Hive population Difference

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by crazy8days, Jun 23, 2012.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    So far I have 3 hives. 2 at my house. 1 at my Uncles. My yard is small and hives are up next to the shed. They get roughly 6 hours of sun. The one at my uncles get 8 or more hours of sun and is in the county. Did my check on them yesterday. The one at my Uncles is a swarm I caught. There population is booming! Started them on new foundation and I have already added a new deep for brood. The 2 at home were bought nucs (3 frame nuc) and noticed when I brought them home one hive seemed smaller than the other. They are still smaller in size about 60% drawn out . The other was at 80% yesterday so added deep.

    With our area going through a drought I figured the ones at home would do better cause of people watering their flowers and lawns. I also feed them 1:1. At my Uncles it's so dry the clover won't bloom. But, they will not take the sugar water and growing bigger than the nucs. Why?

    Feral bees are stronger producers? They get more sunshine? I know driving in my area there is plenty of water, plenty of flowers from homes, parks, planted wildflowers. My Uncles has homes close that get watered , there is a lake across the road but, there are more fields and woods that are brown cause of the drought!

    All hives look very healthy. Is there anything I can do to pick up production for the two at home?

    P.S. Funny thing happened about middle way of writing this. I got a call about a swarm 2 miles down the road. They were on a house window. Ran over there to find they were yellow jackets. Too funny.
     
  2. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    Our swarm hive is building like mad as well. I think that is natural for them to do because they know they are starting from scratch and need to get their stores up before winter.

    I had a lady call me about a swarm she had. She told me they took up residence in her bird house. "Hmm, a bird house is kind of small. Are you sure they are honeybees?" "Oh, absolutely! With out a doubt!" I figured this was going to be easy, I would just lock up the bird house and take the whole thing home... Bumblebees. :lol:
     

  3. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    Im starting to think that maybe all the "playing god" at the big bee yards to produce better queens might not be as good as they think, I bought Buckfast and Allamerican queens and those hives are doing ok but by far my feral hives are much better, my 3 best hives are mutts caught in the area and none of my hives are a year old yet and these 3 have 4 nines on them and close to 100lbs of honey all ready in each, 1 of the 3 was started from a 5 frame full nuc I think it was Febuary, I think natural selection in your area produces better bees for your area , Perry kind of said the same thing about the Aussie queens, they didnt do well cause they were not ready for his area in my opinion so the bees up and replaced them, just my thoughts on the matter and if wrong feel free to point and laugh (cause Im going crazy trapped in the house with all this rain)
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a zookeep snip..
    just my thoughts on the matter and if wrong feel free to point and laugh (cause Im going crazy trapped in the house with all this rain)

    tecumseh:
    well cheer up the rain will pass and the flowers will once again bloom and the beekeeper and the bees shall smile.

    another snip...
    Im starting to think that maybe all the "playing god" at the big bee yards to produce better queens

    tecumseh:
    I am not certain who elected whom to play god?

    and a couple of casual observations...
    1) if you have gone thru somewhat of a dearth sometime it is better to compare hives again after some bloom returns. often time hives do well on up side of a nectar flow and not so well on the down side. establishing like kinds of queen on either side of the nectar flow curve can display enormous difference a short time later.

    2) being on the treatmentless band wagon observation on how well a hive is doing means very little in years 1 and 2.... so nothing really less than 3 years old is a success by my own standards.

    another snip...
    I bought Buckfast and Allamerican queens

    tecumseh:
    can I assume by this that you are talking about RWeaver queens?
     
  5. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I'm surprised my hives at home are slower getting going when they are top feeding. My swarm bees never wanted to take it and doing much better.
     
  6. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    Im not knocking Rweavers queens Im just saying that if hives have been in a location in your area for years and have managed to live through all the crap we as humans have tossed at them (SHBs mites and everything else) and are doing very well population and honey storage then those are the bees you want in your area more then something brought in from another, Im also not quite right on saying my hives are under a year old, most have been where they were removed from for 2 or more years and 1 that Im working on now has been there for 9, the owners of the house they are at said the bees have never missed a year and never been empty, being at there front window near there front door I guess its easy to watch :lol:
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a zookeep snip...
    Im just saying that if hives have been in a location in your area for years and have managed to live through all the crap we as humans have tossed at them (SHBs mites and everything else) and are doing very well population and honey storage then those are the bees you want in your area more then something brought in from another

    tecumseh:
    first and foremost... hopefully zookeep you know I ain't pickin' on you but find some of your statements interesting to reflect upon..

    in regards to your snip I would say well sometimes yes and sometimes no. as I have suggested in some prior thread adaptation of species is generally though to take much longer time span than most of us have for this slow motion change. without a doubt large and dramatic changes in the environment (ahb, shb, etc) makes any change occur at a faster rate <culling in the natural sense of the word is what is happening here.

    for myself when selecting for survivability (imho now likely the most important characteristic of a bee) I want to KNOW the age of the queen in the box and anything else sounds to me to be speculation or alegory. off the cuff observation by folks that are not beekeepers does not add ANY confidence to the speculation as far as my own thinking is concerned.
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    tec:
    "as I have suggested in some prior thread adaptation of species is generally though to take much longer time span than most of us have for this slow motion change."

    zookeep, here is the thread tec is referring to, a great discussion, tec's post about this is #10:
    northern queens