Hive stands for Hoborg

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Hoborg, Mar 10, 2013.

  1. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    Using a hive bottom board with landing platform and screening above the base of the bottom board, I am wondering what kind of a hive stand do I NEED to have. In particular I am asking this. Must the hive stand be open to the ground or can the hive stand be for example solid cinder block or paving stone tightly pushed together leaving no gap between the support surface.

    I was told that I need a gap in the center area of the stand for debris to fall to the ground. Is this as a must or a preferred method or that it will not matter at all?

    NEW TO FORUM AND CANNOT FIND PLACE TO START A NEW POSTING- SO SORRY IF THIS INTRUDES ON THIS POSTING

     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Hoborg, be sure your bottom board has adequate support. I put mine over 18 inches up on a pipe hivestand as skunks like them down lower for better bee access. I use a sticky board below my screen so nothing falls to the ground, as things that fall to the ground can draw trouble. I don't know how to move this to another thread, but Iddee or Charles can.

    Welcome

    Gypsi
    North Texas.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I think I read somewhere that you need about 3" below the screen to be open so mites can't crawl back up.
    By the way, I see this is your first post to the forum. :hi:
    Welcome, you have found a friendly place to read and ask questions.
    We have a lot of knowledge here and we're not afraid to spread it around. :mrgreen:
     
  4. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    [FONT=&amp]Gypsi. I am about to set up two hives and have solid cement squares on paving stones one square for each hive. The squares are a bit larger than the hive bottoms. Everything that fall through the screening will stay under the hives. I had not made up my mind yet about sticky board but if I stay with this set up I will probably use grid lined sticky board. I may need to add height to this set up though since my stand is about 11 high.
    If you would look at the pic and tell me what you think.
    Thanks,
    Hoborg

    [/FONT]
     
  5. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    Thanks PerryBee. I have been out of the gee game since about 1985 so a lot has changed and I am trying to start over correctly. A place like this to ask questions if very valuable.
    Hoborg
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    you need that 3 inch drop to lose the fall through small hive beetles. I couldn't see your photo, but skunks are short and bees are tasty!
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Welcome to the forum Hoborg. :hi: You did the right thing--posting where you found room. We're not sticklers for formalities. The more you post, the better you'll be at finding the "right" place to put your threads. Believe it or not, I still have my occasional misses. If you need technical help from the experts, you can always get the right directions from Charles or Iddee. Send them a PM (private message) if you want and they'll get you on the right track in no time. :grin:
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Welcome back to beekeeping Hoborg Now you have us curious, why did you leave beekeeping. Are you using your old equipment or did you have to buy all new. How many years did you keep bees previously.


    Sorry for the no question marks but evey time I typed one I got `` É`` ' .><^^¸¨¸¸¸¸/" French accents some thing is screwed up in the fonts!
     
  9. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    Return to beekeeping

     
  10. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Welcome and enjoy your stay! :) There's great people here with tons of help.

    I don't do fancy. I like simple (to match my mind). :) Cinder blocks with space between them (because I have screened bottom boards) has worked fine for me so far. The main thing is that they must be capable of supporting the weight of honey-laden frames. Add blocks to adjust the height of the hive so your back is not strained.

    Good luck! :)


    [​IMG]
     
  11. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "I lot has changed since the early 1980s. I never dealt with colony collapse, or mites or beetles and it was pretty easy to keep a productive producing hive. So lots of questions keep coming up. I also joined a local bee group (COBA Central Oklahoma Beekeepers Asso.)and have been attending classes which is a huge help. Glad to have found this site to post questions."

    alot has changed, now it is everything we can do to keep a productive hive. joining a local club is a great decision on your part, and joining this fourm.
    welcome!

    btw, what ef said-
    "You did the right thing--posting where you found room. We're not sticklers for formalities. The more you post, the better you'll be at finding the "right" place to put your threads. Believe it or not, I still have my occasional misses. If you need technical help from the experts, you can always get the right directions from Charles or Iddee. Send them a PM (private message) if you want and they'll get you on the right track in no time."

    lots of room on my thread where you originally posted...:lol: you made me laugh, i thought i was in the wrong place :grin:
    post away, and don't be afraid to ask questions!
     
  12. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Welcome Hoborg,

    This is GREAT forum. Tons of nice, helpful and smart folks. Patient to, I might add.:smile:

    I am new but this is what I learned my first year. I had screened bottom boards and stands about 18 inches off the ground that are open. I started getting Small Hive Beetles. I stayed with the open stands but changed my bottom boards. I still run screened but slide in a plastic sheet or a tray with oil to catch everything that falls through the screen. From what I understand this breaks the SHB life cycle. Then I can remove the trays or plastic sheets and run full open screens if I want, like in August when it's 112 degrees.

    I did inspections Sat and saw 1 hive beetle in all 7 hives. Quiet a few dead ones in the trays. It must bee working. The oil in the trays or on the sticky boards also kills the mites. I liked sliding the trays or sticky boards out during the winter and seeing the cappings sitting on them. I could tell where the cluster was and if it was alive by looking at the cappings. Clean the cappings off and check in a week and would see more cappings on them.
     
  13. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    Thanks all for your input. I will continue visiting the forums. Glad I am here among so many friendly folks who know bees.
     
  14. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Welcome to the forum, Hoborg. :hi:

    I have a similar set-up to you. It is a 3' x 2' concrete paving slab, then an open hive stand and finally the hive above a varroa floor.
     
  15. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    Thanks Barbarian, I think I can go either way but am looking at configurations that will allow me to have an open space or a solid foundation under the hive.
    Hobog
     
  16. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    Barbarian, do you use the sticky sheets on your varroa floor to both catch and count them?
     
  17. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Hoborg,

    I don't use sticky sheets or monitor varroa levels. There are several beeks in my area so I reckon it is wasteful time. I routinely practice IPM and it seems to control the problem. The local climate allows me to leave out the below mesh slide for most of the year. I put the slide in when I am treating with Apiguard (thymol) for the temperature.

    One of the local problems can be damp. An open hive stand allows better air circulation. Debris falling through the mesh falls onto the paving slab. I don't want the debris being retained higher in case it attracts wax moth.

    In winter, with debris falling onto the slab I can see from the fresh wax capping crumbs that the colony is still alive. No need for the "knock... knock. Is there anybody in there ?". This week I was able to do a quick non-invasive check on the hives and all the colonies have come through.

    For info ---- We do not have SHB in this country.
     
  18. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I just pull out my sticky sheet to see what is going on upstairs. I bought a bunch of 4x8 sign material to make my own plastic sticky's
     
  19. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    Oh, I thought all Beatles came from the UK! :roll:
     
  20. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Yeah.... Yeah...... Yeah...... :grin: