hives

Discussion in 'Organic Beekeeping' started by G3farms, May 7, 2010.

  1. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    good reading sam, I had never seen or heard of a Harvey Heritage Hive before.

    thanks for the links!

    G3
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    thanks for sharing sam.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    looks about the size and configuration of an old Jumbo hive (actually I think the deep bodies of the old jumbo were one foot deep) which was just too much bulk and weight for me to handle.

    the fellow's wood working skills did look to be excellent.

    I don't really think I would place too much weight in the argument that "its to much work to keep to queens in one hive". that question is really not about the shape of the hive as far as I can tell.
     
  4. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Since you asked...

    I think the links are nice to know about. But each is a very slanted narrow veiwpoint of the particular hive that each beekeeper is promoting and biased towards. One of the sites mentions cost as being 1/3 the cost of a traditional hive, which usually compares the full purchase price of a standard hive as compared to the cost of self-building the other. Both can be made lower cost, and both can be very expensive to go on the market and purchase.

    One also mentions bees will be healthier based on using one hive over another, which I have not seen. This usually means that comb in one hive is naturally drawn and then compared to comb in a standard foundation hive, with some pretty wild speculation thrown in. But no foundation and natural comb can be used in ANY type hives.

    There are many positives (and negatives) with any hive out there. I have tried my best to be inpartial and list both the pro and con's of each type hive on my website.

    http://www.bjornapiaries.com/top-bar-hive.html

    http://www.bjornapiaries.com/warre-hive.html

    I have many people email me about the Warre hive. It is funny how half are ticked cause they feel I'm negative about them, and how the other half suggests that my observation's are right on the mark. Probably the difference between the two group's is one drinks kool-aid and the other has no agenda to push. :thumbsup:
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    That's an easy one.

    LANGSTROTH......

    Then after a few years experience, try some others.
     
  6. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Depends what your looking for. Each has it's positives. Many are overhyped with wild claims that bees will be healthier or survive better. If you can get past the "fluff", then it comes down to what your trying to do.

    Keep in mind, natural comb or at least foundationless, can be achieved in any hive. The only hive I would NOT suggest is the Warre hive. Inspections and education are sacrificed for supposed benefits of less stress by the very fact that opening them up is nearly impossible because of the comb structure.

    I do not think the TBH is anything even a beginner can not master. They are fun and interesting. But do not get hung up on the hype.

    The langstroth can be almost everything others claim them not to be. You want the smaller cavity as promoted in the Warre....go with 8 frame boxes. You want natural comb as suggested with TBH's....then go with foundationless frames. You want to undersuper....then undersuper. You want less stress....then learn how to work boxes achieving this.

    Personally, I think 8 frame mediums, Langstroth boxes, natural comb, would be my approach if I had to do it all over again.
     
  7. BeeSavers

    BeeSavers New Member

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    I'm currently using 10 frame Langs just like BjornBee is suggesting. I went foundationless on the frames and the boxes are all 10 frame mediums. Honestly I'm just getting my feet wet with Beekeeping. I went with Langstroth because they're easier for me to buy. I have one supplier within reasonable distance and a Dadant I can road trip to in Fresno. Not to mention that all of the Beeks that I consider my mentors use them.
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I would have to say Langs as well.
    There are many options you can do with them and most bee supply stores carry frames, boxes and foundation for them (think interchangable components)

    G3