Homemade Yogurt

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by srvfantexasflood, Jan 3, 2010.

  1. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Has anyone ever made their own yogurt? If so, what did you use for an incubator? If you had good luck, what did you use for a recipe?
    I have to admit I am not a big dairy eater and yogurt (and ice cream) are the only products I will eat on a regular basis.
     
  2. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    I make our yogurt fairly regularly and I'm amazed that it's so easy to do! I use an older cooler with a heating pad on low as my incubator, it seems to work just fine for us. I make a gallon at a time since we go through so much of it, with 3 teens and a dh that eats like 4 teens it takes quite a bit to last a week around here.

    Raw milk is best but pasturized will work, use whole milk or it will tend to be very thin. When I use fluid milk instead of powdered I add either whole cream or powdered milk to it to add to the protein content so it gets nice and thick. We flavor it with brown sugar and vanilla and honey, or a dab of jelly and fruit or jello in whatever flavor you want. For a starter I buy a quart of organic yogurt and use a cup of that, you can also order powdered starters online that work just as well.

    In a large bowl that has a good lid (or gallon jar, or whatever size you need) I mix a gallon of milk that I've heated to just below scalding temp and then cooled to room temp. I heat it to kill any other bacteria that might be present and the warm temp helps encourage the yogurt bacteria to grow and multiply. If I'm using fluid milk I add either a pint of cream or a cup or two of milk powder and stir in well, then add the starter. Sit it down in the cooler with the heating pad on low for 8-12 hours. DO NOT STIR or disturb while it incubates. I've never had this fail on me yet, except when I tried to use skim milk or 2% without adding lots of extra milk powder.....when you remove the fat from the milk you also remove quite a few of the proteins and nutrients.

    After it's done we flavor it and put it in the fridge, it usually disappears around here in a few days time but will probably keep very well for at least ten days maybe two weeks.
     

  3. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    I want to come eat at your house MB! You are always cooking up something, like FRED BREAD. Thanks for the information. I found a nice 2qt. glass jar with a screw on lid at Walmart. I think I will be giving this a try.
     
  4. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    I hope it turns out as well for you as it does for us. LOL, I have no choice but to be always cooking something! My boys eat like a small army.....not that I'm complaining since they also split wood, till the garden, and help process all of the meat. My dh eats like a horse too and has had some very serious digestive issues so I had to learn to make food taste good and be easy on his body at the same time. I'm also extremely frugal (the nice way of saying tightwad) and can't stand to spend money if I don't have to so making good food cheap is a requirement as well.

    I would love to get my hands on some kefir grains and a kombucha scoby so we can try those out too. Our yogurt habit was costing way too much until I started making our own. I started baking our bread when Baby Beek was just a tiny little thing. We lived way out in the sticks.....seriously, a 35 minute drive to the nearest town with a WalMart. I went to work on a dairy farm and helped run a brick oven and very primitive bakery. Some of the most tiring work I've ever done in my life but I learned how to make so many different kinds of bread it's not funny and learned that I love to bake bread. I learned alot about healthy eating vs. what we are taught is healthy by our gov't subsidized industrial food production companies and had a ball watching my kids chasing chickens and cows and feeding cinnamon rolls to the pigs and horses.

    All of that learning is paying off now. Baby Beek will turn 17 in a few weeks and I can see glimpses of the wife and mother that she will someday be. It sure does make me thankful that I had the opportunities to learn all of the good food skills that I did. It pays in more ways than I can count to know how to eat well without tons of prepackaged stuff in the cabinets.

    Wow, I sure didn't mean to ramble on like that! You are certainly welcome for a visit anytime you want to come.... I can guarantee there will something fit to eat around here.
     
  5. Sundance

    Sundance New Member

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    I have used the Salton maker. Easy to use and inexpensive. They can be
    had on ebay for like $20 (give or take)