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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to know where to buy honey bottles at reasonable price. I did receive a free sample from Sailor plastic. Prices good?
 

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Those seem to be a little high but maybe not, I order some from Brushy Mountain that were only 45 cents each and a dime for the caps, I can let you know how they are when I get them Monday sometime.

kebee
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm surprised to get only 2 responses. Not sure why.
 

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Yes I would say fair, they are cheaper than some I order from Brushy Mountain last week, will try them next time.

kebee
 

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I just received my order of 321 1lb. squeeze bottles from Brushy. I usually get my stuff from ML due to free shipping, but the case lot of 321 bottles does not qualify for free shipping. After a couple of phone calls-I found that Brushy is not only $10.00 cheaper, but the shipping was $20.00 less. The odd thing is-the lids come in lots of 250. I got these from ML-it's always easy to find other things to bring the order up to $100.00. I got a pair of beekeeper mudflaps for my pickup.:grin:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Received my 1lb. plastic oval jars from www.sailorplastics.com. Also, my flip top caps. 225 each. Jars are $0.28 per. Flip top caps w/liners are $0.10 each. Include shipping and each complete jar cost me $0.49 each. Thinking that is a pretty good deal.
 

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Canning jars are universally popular but with 1 quart (3 lbs) jars at $9/dozen and pints (1 1/2 lbs) at $7/doz. (off the shelf retail) they are certainly not the cheapest source of packaging.

The more rustic aesthetics ("farm fresh") is appealing for these.

As for aesthetics, despite more than 20 years in the plastics and injection molding industry, I clearly prefer my honey to be stored and sold in glass jars. Even plain glass jelly jars are preferred over more decorative plastics.

(I don't have any real reason, it is just a personal preference.)
 

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I'll throw in my 2 cents for canning jars. I'm in the camp that likes glass myself rather than plastic, and I couldn't find any glass "honey" bottles anywhere in town, so I just went with some half pint jars to have a few jars to sell. (I'm constantly getting asked if I sell my honey, and I've never had enough excess and/or had it in sellable containers before, so I decided to do that this year.) They were on sale at my local hardware store and just .45c a piece.

For gifts, I regularly look around at crafting stores like Michael's and JoAnn's and the like, to find interesting shaped and pretty bottles and jars. Those are generally too much for me to want to have them to sell honey in, but I think it makes the gift a little more gifty, since a decorative container could be used by the giftee after the honey is all eaten up.

For my own storage...heh, my husband and I have always saved glass jars and cans to just use for leftovers and whatever (to get rid of all our plastic tupperware) and so we've got honey in pickle jars, tomato sauce jars, salsa jars and just about everything else with a tight sealing lid. We have been keeping a tiny amount each year in very tight sealing 2 ounce spice jars, and we plan on saving that until we're retired, and having a little...time line of all of our years of honey.

We even saved an empty scotch bottle that had a pretty shape and a very tight cork lid, and have a "fifth" of honey! It's gorgeous and so that one we keep out on our liquor cabinet/buffet thing in the dining room as decoration.
 

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I myself sell honey in glass. either standard half pint, pint and quart mason type jars or recycled glass jars (has to have an acceptable and useable lid). I get the latter from folks who frequent our farmer's market and sell these at a slightly lower price.

as far as fancy goes... I think if my customers do have a preference it is for a honey in a simple glass jar (of any kind) with a very simple label.

in shipping honey (primarily to relatives) I do pour these up in larger (half gallon size or so) recycled plastic juice containers.
 

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I also favor glass. I really don't think that plastic is non toxic. Something like milk of juice that's in there for a couple of weeks is fine, but when the honey is in there for a year it definitely reacts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
but when the honey is in there for a year it definitely reacts.
Where did you find that information? There are so many items that are stored in food grade containers and for long period of time. Besides, I don't think 1 lb. of honey is going to last a year.
 

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I got the information from my taste buds. Stuff stored in plastic for a long time tastes a little different. It's not the 1st lb. of honey I'm concerned about, but the 20th that I won't get to till next summer. You can call it paranoia, but recent problems with BPA in plastic water bottles has me right turned off. Took them like 20 years to admit there was a dangerous chemical in baby bottles. Modern toxicology is not really modern enough. Say you have 1 part per million, that's about 1 pancake in a stack of pancakes a mile high, on the other hand it translates to about 1000 molecules in a table spoon of water.
 

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pistol pete writes..
I got the information from my taste buds. Stuff stored in plastic for a long time tastes a little different.

tecumseh:
I agree. Some food product are just less reactive than others which I would guess has to do with a food products basic acidity. One of the worst offenders for me is chicken frozen in those plastic shrink wrapped bags.
 
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