Honey Bound

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Mlou, Aug 10, 2012.

  1. Mlou

    Mlou New Member

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    I'm a new beekeeper on the upside of the learning curve. I'm in Northeast Ohio, it's early August and my bees are about to produce their 2 super of honey this season. But honestly, that hive appears pretty crowded. I was in it this morning and when i was checking the honey super, the bees were very calm. I took that off to check to upper deep box and that didn't go over well with them. It appears that the upper deep is completely full of capped honey. I checked just a few frames and don't see any brood or queen cells...but then i don't know if i should be looking for these in the top or bottom boxI didn't get into the bottom box but will try again. I've tried to find info on honey bound hives on the internet...but honestly, can't some put it into simple terms?
     
  2. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

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    If a box is pulled to 8 frames, I add another super of frames. The bees need 2 boxes for honey and brood. I do not take from their supers, as they need this to go through the winter. They put both brood and honey/pollen/bee bread in as they like it arranged. Above those go the honey supers...(some do and some don't add a queen excluder) before the honey supers. If you have honey to harvest above the 2nd, and cannot get to it, you can still add another honey super (usually below the full honey) and they will keep it tended, til you can extract it. I think this is a good problem to have?
     

  3. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    If you aren't ready to harvest a full super yet and didn't want to add another full ten frames, you could simply pull a few of the outside capped honey frames and replace them with empty ones (bare foundation, foundationless, empty drawn comb, whatever.).

    This is what I've been doing for the past couple of weeks. I appear to have too many SHB in my area to feel comfortable adding an empty, undrawn, foundationless super this late in the season
    I felt it would provide too much room for the beetles to hide...

    Once I have 4 to 6 drawn, capped frames in storage, then I'll add these and additional box back on one of my hives.

    I am doing the same thing with brood boxes in trying to expand a recent cut-out colony. It is just filling a single deep. The plan (this weekend actually!) will be to pull one or two frames from each of my other hives to give them a decent start on the second box.

    BTW: I am only about 10 minutes from you in Amherst...
     
  4. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    Honey bound simply means as a result of the surplus stores, the queen no longer has any room to lay. Quite often, this will lead to swarming, even late season swarms.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Welcome Mlou: :hi:

    You have found a great place to look around and ask questions. You are also extremely lucky to apparently be only 10 minutes away from Paul! :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :wink:
    Enjoy this friendly forum, ask questions when you have them and feel free to contribute when you wish.
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Honey bound means all cells are full in and around the brood nest. Go in the bottom box. If there are no empty cells awaiting eggs, remove the outer frame that has no brood and place an empty frame in the middle of the box.
     
  7. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Welcome Mlou, from another Buckeye beek. I'm about 33 miles from you in Greenwich.
     
  8. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Welcome Mlou! Thanks Iddee for the tip on relieving the brood box. I had been thinking about hive inspections lately. I have not messed with the brood boxes since placing honey supers on. Is it advisable to conduct full inspections during honey flows unless you sense their is issues below?
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You should have a reasonable idea of the condition of the whole hive at all times. The activity outside, your level of experience, the weather, etc. dictates how often they are inspected to achieve this goal.