Honey for Healing Wounds

Discussion in 'Products of the Hive' started by Hobie, Mar 17, 2010.

  1. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Okay, I admit it. I did something really dumb today and am now living with a big ugly gash on my finger.

    I have read about using honey as a wound dressing. Most articles talk about "Medi-honey" or Manuka. Is there any reason I could not use my own honey? Could the pollen and possible bee-parts in it be detrimental to healing? I only strain my honey through a nylon cloth.

    Also, is there any danger in putting honey in a rather deep wound? Even though my brain knows better, I apparently have this deep-seated mental mind-set that honey is 'food" and you need to keep food out of wounds.
     
  2. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Hobie, i wouldn't tell you to use it or not, but have read where the Romans used honey to heal wounds after battle. :thumbsup: When i had knee replaement i put honey on the scar after they removed the staples, and you can't hardly see the scar. Jack
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I won't advise you medically, but I would already have the cut saturated with my honey. Honey produces hydrogen peroxide, a little at a time, as needed, to keep a wound sanitized. It also seals it from the atmosphere to keep contaminates out.
     
  4. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    I would put honey on it asap! Even with the stitches Baby Beek had at Christmas time she got honey on the wound at every dressing change.
     
  5. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Thanks! I've already changed the dressing this morning, using neosporin, so maybe honey next time. The good news is that it looks ugly, but clean. I've used honey on lesser scraped before, and the only problem is that it oozes through the bandage and I get sticky stuff all over the house. (Has anyone solved that issue?)

    Beware of wood-carving tools! Why I wasn't wearing the leather gloves I "always" wear, I don't know.
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Hobie, so your a wood carver to. I'm not, but have two brothers who are and they win alot of blue ribbons at the county fair. Which is a mystery to me, because when they were kids they couldn't chew gum and walk at the same time. :mrgreen: Jack

    PS. they have been to the emergency room a few times. :roll:
     
  7. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    To help keep the ooze from spreading we just put gauze and then one of the "telfa" type pads on it with the special backing that keep stuff from coming through. The other thing I've tried is to keep a glove on but that annoys me to no end.

    I hope it heals quickly for you! In the absence of honey on the wound you may want to flush it out once a day with diluted hydrogen peroxide to help fight off the nasties and make sure to take plenty of vitamin C and garlic too.
     
  8. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    For what it's worth:

    I had 2 dressing changes with the traditional neosporin antibiotic. Rinsed with dilute hydrogen peroxide between dressings, and it was not "fizzing" so I felt it was clean.

    Yesterday evening I cleaned and dressed with honey. This morning, dressing was stuck (ouch!) and when I rinsed, the hydrogen peroxide was all fizzy again. So I went back to the neosporin. I may have some strangeness in my honey that makes it less than ideal for wound dressing.

    I may try it again when the wound is a little more healed up.

    Jack - my carvings are not what I'd call fair material, but I enjoy working with wood. I've made a heron that came out well, and carved a few bowls, but they are heavy and... let's just call them "functional"! but I love the grain. My latest project is a fish, carve from a scrap of Hackberry, which is a wonderful pink color.
     
  9. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Hobie I would apply the honey to the wound from the inside ;), applied with a hot home made biscut!!

    G3
     
  10. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Now, there's a man who's thinking! I'll have to try that. :D
     
  11. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    Honey has been used as a wound-dressing because of it's anti-microbial properties. The same thing that keeps honey from spoiling will keep a gash from getting infected. I keep a jar of honey in my emergency supply kit for just that reason. As far as I know, any honey will do just as good a job. I read a paper last year that showed honey worked even better than neosporin on cuts, but I can't remember where I read it and I can't seem to find it now.
     
  12. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Maybe using honey on a wound is where the term "licking your wounds came from" :lol: :lol:
     
  13. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    For what it's worth, I switched to a honey dressing, and then later to a honey-comfrey mixture. Finger healed up pretty good, but still have a blob of scar tissue in the middle. Could've been much worse.

    I'm amazed that, except in the worst part, my fingerprint grew back! Fascinating.
     
  14. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    I think part of why honey makes such a good wound-dressing is because it satisfies both recommendations excellently rather than just one like store-bought wound-dressings do. Those recommendations being to keep wounds clean (microbe free) and to keep them dry. Honey kills microbes, and because it's so hydroscopic it's really dryer than air even though it looks, feels, and acts like it's wet. Whereas store bought wound dressings also kill microbes, but they only seal the wound from outside moisture (but also trap moisture underneath the oily film) as opposed to honey which removes that moisture.