Honey harvesting

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Bruce Bee, May 20, 2014.

  1. Bruce Bee

    Bruce Bee New Member

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    How long does honey need to stay capped before harvesting?
     
  2. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    Once honey is capped it is ready to be harvest. Bees have gotten it ready and will not capped it until they do so you can take it out than.

    ​Ken
     

  3. Bruce Bee

    Bruce Bee New Member

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    Thanks Ken. How long can honey remain capped before harvesting? I have one super with capped honey and another that looks about a month away. I would like to harvest it all at the same time.
     
  4. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    You can wait until all is ready, that is what most of us do anyway unless you have 50 or more hives than it would be to much at one time, especial for me, no I only have 4 hives.

    ​Ken
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Depending on your method of extracting and the floral source of your honey, you might prefer early extracting or late extracting.
    Some honeys (like cotten flower honey) crystalize soon after they are sealed in their cells. If you wait too long, the extracting of the crystalized honey can become very difficult and even damaging to your combs upon spinning in an extractor.
    When first capped, there is a small air space between the stored honey surface and the capping wax. As time passes, the capping sinks and adheres to the stored honey in the cell. If you uncap with a capping fork and remove the honey early, it's a simple process to remove the cappings with little lost honey adhering to the wax. If you wait, you'll find it a slower process and more honey will be stuck to the cappings thus requiring additional separation methods to get a maximal honey crop. On the other hand, if you cut your combs open with a knife (cold or heated), it will make little difference whether you extract sooner or later.
     
  6. supercoop

    supercoop New Member

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    I have a question and hope it's OK to post here instead of starting a new thread.
    I'm planning on extracting my honey Friday night after work at a friends house that has an extractor. My question is will it be OK for me to remove all the supers I plan on extracting honey from (yes I'll be leaving them plenty for them to eat) I want to put the supers in a plastic bag and put them in my Honda CRV tomorrow night, then when I get to work take them out and bring them inside work since is really hot and humid out (Thomasville, North Carolina) end of the day put them back in car then to my friends house.
    Does this sound like it'll work or will I have problems in the morning with bees all around my car. I leave my house at 6:30am
    Thanks in advance,
    Herb
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    It's okay to post wherever you want so long as you're on the topic---BUT, starting a new threaad can often be to your advantae because sosme people look for new threads to post to and if you post on an old one, you may be missing the opportunity to have more members express their opinions. You wouldn't want to be stuck with my answer just because it was an only opinion :lol:
    That having been said, I would hesitate to advise you to try your suggestion. Remember that inside of a super the frames stand upright and jostle against each other only minimally as the car lurches when starting, stopping suddenly or taking a sharp turn. In a bag the frames will rub against each other and transporting them in and out of the car will most likely cause a lot of good honey to get pressed out of the frames as they move. You'll end up with a real mess of honey sticking around everything inside the bags (assuming, hopefully, that nothing tears) and probably a lot of good honey will be needleesly lost. True, standing in the supers takes a lot more room, but in the end, it will be to your advantage transporting them that way.
    Having re-read your question before answering, I realize that I misunderstood your plans. Sorry. :roll:
    Keeping the frames in the supers and placing the supers in plastic bags to move them in and out of the car shouldn't be a problem. It's extra work but certainly better than having the combs melt in the car and release the honey --- that would be a lot worse.
     
  8. supercoop

    supercoop New Member

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    Thanks for the advice
     
  9. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    The bees wont know that they are their unless you do a Hansel and Gretal and leave a honey trail for them to follow. If the supers are sealed and you leve them in the car with the window down a little for ventilation the honey extracts better when it is wormed to 90 deg. F.
     
  10. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    lol I did what Apis said 1 time, the bees smell the supers and they were all over the inside of my van, they could not get at the honey but that didnt stop 100s of them from getting in the truck and trying :lol:
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Zook---you're lucky they couldn't get to the honey, because if they could have reached it, your van would have had not hundreds but thousands of bees----and you would have had a much lighter crop.
    When something like that happens, they get into a robbing frenzy and the best this=ng to do is to wait till night, when, if you're lucky, the bees will all have gone home. Then move the van and take the supers into the extracting room. If you're not lucky, you just might have to go throught the whole process of clearing the supers of bees a second time.
     
  12. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Just as bees can recognize flowers, their hive, they also recognize a beekeepers truck spill a little pollen or honey in the back and from then on park in the yard and the bees will be at it within a minute of driving in the yard.
     
  13. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Apis, that sounds like a sneaky way for a scoundrel to kidnap someone else's bees.