honey jar label info

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by beetree, May 8, 2012.

  1. beetree

    beetree New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    what info is required to be on the label to sell 'ripe honey' without the comb in NC? and...where do you 'stop' filling when filling the 1 # glass jars so you can be consistent with really having "one pound"
    Just "try'n to do in right in NC"!
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The words "pure honey"

    Net Weight

    Contact info.
     

  3. Omie

    Omie New Member

    Messages:
    2,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Isn't there a requirement for the caution against feeding honey to babies?- i thought that was a federal requirement. ?
     
  4. kebee

    kebee Active Member

    Messages:
    1,008
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Omie I have never heard of this federal requirement, what may have brough this up, is it bad are cause some reaction on babies.

    kebee
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    omie,
    hmmm, might have to double check.....wisconsin does not require that warning...kebee you can go to to honey.com's website for the info, (the nat'l honeyboard).....looking this up for you right now:grin:
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    kebee, here is the link:
    infants and honey

    From the National Honey Board:

    Infants and Honey

    Why can’t I feed honey to my baby less than 1 year of age?
    Honey may contain Clostridium botulinum spores that can cause infant botulism - a rare but serious disease that affects the nervous system of young babies (under one year of age). C. botulinum spores are present throughout the environment and may be found in dust, soil and improperly canned foods. Adults and children over one year of age are routinely exposed to, but not normally affected by, C. botulinum spores. Honey is safe to consume during pregnancy and lactation. While infants are susceptible to the infant botulism, adults, including pregnant females, are not. The concern for babies stems from the fact that infants lack the fully developed gastrointestinal tract of older humans. Since the mother is not in danger of developing this condition, the unborn baby is protected. Spores are inactivated when manufactured food products (such as cereals or nuts) receive a roasting heat treatment. Graham crackers or cereal, for example, would not contain any viable microbial spores.

    kebee,
    you can figure out the science language.....:lol:
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    what iddee said, and at the 'neck' of the jar....there is a 'band' or 'ring', fill it to that, good to go, unless you want to weigh every jar :grin:
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Honey is just the scapegoat, as any raw food contains the botulism spores. It's just that few, if any, other raw foods are normally fed to babies less than a year old.

    No, it is not a federal requirement. In fact, any processed honey is fine for all babies, as the heat has killed the spores.
     
  9. Omie

    Omie New Member

    Messages:
    2,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0