Honey/Pollen Extraction

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Dbure, Aug 6, 2012.

  1. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    This is our second year of extracting honey and I saw something that I have a couple of questions on. When looking at one of the combs with light behind it most of the comb was beautifully light yellow with white cappings over it. But an area of the comb appeared to be much darker and hard to see through. In using a toothpick to investigate it looked like those cells contained what appeared to be pollen. Do bees cap over their pollen? My concern was that something had infected the cells and that I was just mistaking it for pollen. How does any of this effect the honey that is removed and bottled? :confused:
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Many times they will fill cells part way with pollen next to the brood. When the brood nest moves down, the pollen isn't moved, and the cells are finished and capped with honey. Nothing to worry about.
     

  3. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    Thanks Iddee. I was wondering since I did not see that last year. However, I know that it was their first year and alot changes in the nest over a year. I have a bucket of honey sitting on my kitchen counter half full that was extracted yesterday. Do you usually see foam or air bubbles on top of yours when you extract it? Is there a way to eliminate that so it does not go into the bottles?
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2012
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Let it set for about 3 days and scrape it off,. or use a honey gate near the bottom of the bucket.
     
  5. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    I was just reading on another thread about that.:thumbsup: I had some jars of honey crystallize from last year's pull and found that they turned back clear when set in hot (not boiling) water. I actually keep my house a little too cool for extracting. A honey house with a warmer thermostat is on my honey's to-do list.:grin:
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    The honey is perfectly extractable and of top quality---BUT, be aware, if you use an extractor that has to be balanced, as the honey leaves the frames, since the pollen does not, the frames tend to get out of balance and the extractor starts to wobble. No need for concern. However, if you have more than one frame with pollen it it, it's best to balance them one opposite the other. That should reduce the imbalance that develops if one frame empties out completely and the one opposite it doesn't. :smile: