Honey strainer, grid dimension

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Barde, Sep 22, 2012.

  1. Barde

    Barde New Member

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    Time for my first honey harvest, i have prepared my honey extractor,
    i just want to ask for some advice about the strainer.

    What is your advice, what should be the size of the holes on the grid?
    So the honey can strain with good speed, but to keep the wax.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    the tempof the honey while extracting and how often you clean the strainer will dictate how fast the honey will fillter through. Good things take time:thumbsup:
     

  3. klpauba

    klpauba New Member

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    For my first honey extraction, I used the nylon paint strainer (sized for my 5 gallon food-grade bucket) that I bought at Lowes. Worked great!
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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  5. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I have honestly had the best luck with paint strainers from hardware stores that fit 5 gallon bucket. G3 coached me on that early on about cutting the middle out of a lid and planting it over the filter edges to keep it steady. And to answer your question about speed, I think the paint strainer was relatively quick, however the last part of honey stuck in the wax will take all night to strain out.

    I recently tried ordering from Dadant. I ordered the 200, 400, 600 filter trays for the 5 gallon buckets. The 400 was back ordered. The 600 strained fast but did not catch all the debris. The 200 took all night but was very clear. I wills stick with 600 and 400...and will revert back to the paint strainers.
     
  6. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    I've had good luck with the 400 micron strainer-that was the only one my local supplier had on hand last year when I did my first harvest. I've since bought the stainless steel double strainer, and I really like it.
     
  7. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Letting the wax rise and skim it or decant from the bottom is important to save filter plugging. If you scrape inside the filter to increase flow it forces wax particles through. I doesnt bother me to see oily surface on my honeyed drinks but it puts some people off and it does manage to smear up glass ware etc., unless you have hotter than average tap water.
    600 micron can pass a fair bit of wax. I think 400 is middle of the road and 200 is do-able but slow. I think it worthwhile for any honey you want to showcase but certain customers are sold on the idea of the "raw honey" concept so throw a few legs and antennae parts in to satisfy them.:lol: