Honey Taste Weird!

Discussion in 'Products of the Hive' started by jmblakeney, May 12, 2012.

  1. jmblakeney

    jmblakeney New Member

    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I had removed just one medium frame of honey a couple days ago and did a crush and strain on it. It was about 2/3 capped or just a little more. After tasting it, it taste kinda weird. Kinda like it has an alcohol type flavor to it. I have tried honey from other frames in the hive and it tasted great, but not this though. Could it have been b/c it wasn't fully capped? Or was this honey just a little fermented?
    Any opinions are appreciated.

    James
     
  2. Omie

    Omie New Member

    Messages:
    2,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Have you been feeding this hive while the super was on or the honey was being made?

    Do you know what blooming in your area right now?
     

  3. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

    Messages:
    364
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0

    should you not feed with the honey super on?
     
  4. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

    Messages:
    288
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Never. They'll stash sugar syrup in the super. That might fly in China, but not here.
     
  5. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

    Messages:
    364
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So after I put on a honey super I shoul take the Hive top feeder off untill I harvest the honey?
     
  6. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

    Messages:
    288
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yeah. I mean, there is no guarantee that your bees aren't being fed by a neighbor beekeeper who open feeds syrup, but the rule is, when the supers go on, you stop feeding.

    I've heard people wonder if the bees don't perhaps move honey around inside the hive to the point that previously stored syrup might get moved up into the supers after you stop feeding and add supers, but maybe someone else has the answer to that.
     
  7. Omie

    Omie New Member

    Messages:
    2,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You should stop feeding all syrup once you are going to put on honey supers.

    Never feed syrup and make honey at the same time. It seems to me a lot of beginners are now doing this, because everyone keeps telling them to "feed, feed, feed until they won't take it anymore". But no one says "Feed until you want to get some honey- then stop feeding".
    Otherwise you won't have pure honey, but rather a combination of honey and sugar syrup, which will ferment and taste weird like icky alcohol, as you are experiencing. Needless to say, you shouldn't be eating, giving away, or selling such product.
    As beekeepers, we have a responsibility to produce pure honey- the bees make pure honey only from flower nectar, not from sugar or corn syrup. A hive strong enough to produce extra honey for you is strong enough not to need to be fed anymore.
    Hope this helps! :)
     
  8. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

    Messages:
    288
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It was the original poster (jmblakeney) who was experiencing the odd tasting honey, not medic1259, but you are 100% correct, sugar syrup "honey" doesn't taste good, is liable to ferment and ruin the whole batch and isn't legally/ethically/technically honey at all. I have to hope that the guys saying, "Feed feed feed until they won't take anymore," really mean, "Feed them until the flow starts, at which time they will gather nectar and ignore your syrup, at which time you should then put supers on." And even that isn't very good advice, unless they are trying to get folks to enable their bees to backfill the whole hive with syrup and provoke a swarm before the flow even starts.....
     
  9. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Maybe the bee are making mead :wink: ?

    I don't feed when stuff is blooming. I have a 2 frame bait hive on a trapout (there's a pic in another thread), and just enough bees to cover what little brood there is and they've covered the majority of a frame in nectar since Thursday. I've started 6 other nucs this spring and haven't fed any of them and they are growing and drawing comb and expanding and a good pace. I think nectar is better for them and it's free!
     
  10. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    jim, you said the frame was about 2/3 capped? may have been your problem. it was not yet 'honey'. here is a great method for those who do not invest in a refractometer to test the water content of your honey. take a frame that has any uncapped nectar on it, and give it a hard shake to the ground, if any liquid flies out, this is not honey. just put the frame back in and let the bees finish it off.
     
  11. pturley

    pturley New Member

    Messages:
    419
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Riverbee is correct, it wasn't evaporated down enough not to start fermenting.

    Now that you have it out of the frames, you could always make mead out of it (since you are sort of halfway there already!).