Honeybee Deaths Linked to Corn Insecticides

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Beefarmer, Mar 16, 2012.

  1. Beefarmer

    Beefarmer New Member

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    [h=3]
    Dead+HoneyBee.jpg
    What was killing all those honeybees in recent years? New research shows a link between an increase in the death of bees and insecticides, specifically the chemicals used to coat corn seeds.

    The study, titled “Assessment of the Environmental Exposure of Honeybees to Particulate Matter Containing Neonicotinoid Insecticides Coming from Corn Coated Seeds,†was published in the American Chemical Society’s Environmental Science & Technology journal, and provides insight into colony collapse disorder.
    [/h][h=3]Honeybee Deaths Linked to Corn Insecticides[/h]
     
  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Not good news considering I am surrounded by corn fields here....dang...
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  4. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Remember how a year or two ago, anyone suggesting that these neonic pesticides and seed coatings were harming bees was ridiculed for being a hysterical tree-hugging kook? They were told to go read the 'irrefutable scientific research' (conducted in part by the manufacturer) that proved these chemicals were safe for bees. Right.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    oh come on Omie get on the corporate band wagon. you should know that the corporate folks do nothing but good for the world and that greed is the greatest good to resolve the worlds many problems.

    for myself the logical conclusion of the way these products worked highly suggested to me that the ultimate outcome was known but ignored (all in the name of making $ in the short term). :smile:
     
  6. Joseph Clemens

    Joseph Clemens New Member

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    Can neonicotinoids really be that bad?

    Really now, how can insecticides, known to be toxic in the tinniest of trace amounts, and that do their work by permeating every part of the growing plant, including guttation water, nectar, and pollen - ever be harmful to honey bees? Of course, not considering that they will likely also be picked up by every other species of plant in the vicinity of the target crop.

    If it were true that these insecticides; neonicotinoids, were so insidious, how could the highly educated and very wise men and women running the appropriate regulatory agencies ever approve their release into our environment? And, if the present research reports were true, how could these same people whom we trust with our very lives and the protection of our environment (and I might add, their own lives and environment), allow neonicotinoids to continue being used, as they still are?

    Personally, I don't really appreciate that I'm probably ingesting some of these new synthetic neurotoxins with my every bite of food, but that's just me. After all aren't these neonicotinoids very low in toxicity to mammals? I'm sure that there are many toxins throughout our environment, which we are regularly exposed to that also have low toxicity, otherwise wouldn't we all be dead, already? And, of course, no one really gives much consideration to how these new toxins will interact with various organisms, the environment, or the plethora of previously existing chemical compounds, some of which are already known to be toxic, that already exist in the environment. The macabre game of "Russian Roulette" comes readily to mind. I'm glad I've already put fifty-five years behind me, and hope I get the chance to keep putting more years there too.
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    neonicotinoids, AKA nicotine. Simple..... Since you can't smoke anymore, just get your nicotine fix at the local grocery store.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a Joseph snip..
    If it were true that these insecticides; neonicotinoids, were so insidious, how could the highly educated and very wise men and women running the appropriate regulatory agencies ever approve their release into our environment? And, if the present research reports were true, how could these same people whom we trust with our very lives and the protection of our environment (and I might add, their own lives and environment), allow neonicotinoids to continue being used, as they still are?

    tecumseh:
    as in many things 'follow the money' is usually a good first explanation.

    of course a certain social attitude is important here as well... since some folks now seem to think (contrary to all available data) that government has no function and business can regulate itself these are the kind of results almost any thinking person should expect.
     
  9. AcmeBees

    AcmeBees New Member

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    As a life long conservative, and now more a libertarian. I am almost always against government regulation and intrusion into my life. That said, people like me and others with similar views do not see government as having no function. I understand that there is a need for things like the interstate highway system, and environmental protection, etc. People of my view also consider capitalism and the corporate way as the fabric of what America is all about. At issue here is government no longer acts for the good of the people, society, or environment. They act in the interest of who pays for elections.

    I have watched a couple documentaries and read some on this issue. The biggest problems I see with the government permission to use these chemicals is:
    1. The decision was made using Bayers studies and data. (No independent studies)
    2. The toxicity data is based on lethal doses of adult bees.
    3. No study was required for approval with respect to the effects on brood or any other bee behavior.

    My point is you can't blame Bayer for trying to make a product for their consumer base. I am sure their intent was not to kill bees. If they had data and supressed it that this could happen, that's another story.
    You can however place blame on the government, who once again did not act in our interest, probably did not have a bee expert review Bayers data, and allowed this product to be spread across this country with residuals lasting who knows how long. All due to lobby money and the interest in the next election.

    I am not saying I have a solution and am not trying to be inflamatory. I also offer condolences to those who have been impacted by this.

    A good start for reform would be to repeal the 17th amendment. If the senate was still the voice of the states in Washington instead of an elected "Super" house of representatives, smaller groups such as beekeepers would have easier and quicker access to federal regulation reform. It would also cut the lobby money to half of the power of Congress.
     
  10. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    It is mankinds' genetic predisposition to live for immediate fulfillment and to strongly discount long term effects. There are a few people who look at long range affect but they are not contributing much genetic material to the gene pool compared to the portion of the population who live for the moment. Man lacks any effective sense of self control. Greed, deception, and killing off other species who compete for resources are part of what makes man so great; just look at how his numbers have grown! Surely he must be blesssed!

    In the long term it may be found that his lack of self control is a fatal flaw.
     
  11. Big Bear

    Big Bear New Member

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    http://www.pesticideinfo.org/List_P...Chem_Name=Clothianidin&PC_Code=044309, 660108 This is a partial list of registered products listing Clothianidin as an ingredient.

    However, what this list doesn't show is other pesticidal products containing Clothianidin such as Bayer Advanced All-in-One Rose & Flower Care Ready-to-Use Granules, Arena 0.25 G Insecticide is for use on landscape ornamentals, interior plantscapes and non-bearing fruit trees,


    these products are used on potato crops...all are forms of neonicotinoids

    imidacloprid
    Bayer in-furrow/seed trt.
    Admire Pro Bayer seed treatment
    Gaucho Bayer foliar
    Provado Bayer foliar
    Leverage1/ Makhteshim foliar, soil
    Pasada, Alias Cheminova foliar and soil
    Couraze

    thiamethoxam

    Syngenta in furrow
    Platinum Syngenta foliar
    Actara Syngenta seed treatment
    Cruiser
    acetamiprid Cerexagri foliar
    Assail

    clothianidin
    Bayer‘ seed treatment
    Poncho2/ Arvesta in furrow
    Belay2/ Arvesta foliar
    Clutch2/

    dinotefuran
    Valent in furrow/foliar
    Venom2


    Imidacloprid is used in products you can find at this link... and several others.
    tru-green chemalwn and many other use Merit products which also contain Imidacloprid in urban lawns and gardens.

    These neonicotinoids are used in places and products that people don't realize are beyond farm crops. they are used right in your very backyard or neighbors yards.