Horse Dies From Bee Stings

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by riverbee, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    articles here:

    daily interlake stings of misfortune

    missoulian bees identified as stinging insect horse death

    nbc montana horse dies after bee stings
    (this video has a picture of a couple bees collected.)

    my son and mother told me about this unfortunate stinging incident with this horse, and asked me if honey bees were this aggressive. long and the short of it, the horse was rubbing and scratching his backside up against a tree that contained a swarm, the swarm was dislodged and dropped down on his butt. the horse took off bucking and kicking. the owner went to put him in the barn and discovered the mass of bees on his backside and 'raked them off" (owner was not stung), they called the vet, the vet came out and later loaded him up in a trailer and took him to the vet's office. the horse had gone into anaphylactic shock and within 15 hours, suffered so poorly, had to be put down.

    the owner described the bees as 'small black bee's' or 'hornets' and 'looked like flies', saved some and sent them to be identified.

    the paper's recently reported that the bees have been identified by 'insect experts', from the dept of agriculture, and montana state university, as 'wild honey bees.'

    here is the interesting part of the daily interlake article: "A local beekeeper said they likely were wasps or hornets but were “absolutely†not honey bees. A pest-management specialist thought the insects resembled European or Africanized honey bees.

    :confused: hmmm, on this, the comment by the beekeeper vs the pm specialist and AHB? i am familiar with this area, and there are commercial keeps who take their bees south and then bring them back to montana. the columbia falls stage road (where they live) is scattered up and down with commercial hives and is a great forage area.
     
  2. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    The whole thing sounds poorly documented, so it's hard to know what to believe.
    I guess one evident thing though is that the horse was not covered all over by thousands of attacking bees- but rather had a serious allergic reaction and went into ana.shock, just like some people do.
     

  3. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    thanks omie, you are most likely right about poor documentation by the news media, and hard to know what to believe. very unfortunate for the owners and the horse. when we think of anaphylactic shock, we think of humans and not the animals we love. what i found interesting was that the horse dislodged the swarm.....sort of funny, but not the ultimate result, very heartbreaking, the death of the horse. swarms by nature are gentle, don't know about landing on the butt end of a horse, but very thought provoking.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a few years ago while removing a feral hive from a house owned by a vet he informed me that the timing of stings and anaphylactic shock (and thank ya' riverbee for spellin' that word) often go hand in hand for farm animals. he explained it this way.... upon the first sting it requires about 24 days for an animal (and I would suppose the human form also applies here) to build immunity to the venom it received in the sting. if an animal gets another sting prior to the elapse of this time period then an animal is 'set up' for a severe case of anaphylactic shock.
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    thank you tecumseh for the explanation of this, i had no idea.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    this reminded me of how 'unusual' that particular cut out turned out to be. first I had a sample of bees tested for africanization and got the green light and then 2 days after I finished the cut out the bee lab called me back and told me they had rerun the sample using a genetic test and the hive had turned out to be significantly africanized. lucky for me the hive had perished and I had not.

    the vet (actually both the man and wife were retired vets) talked to me the whole time thru a screen window in his house (and thus the prior story) and while we were talking one of his wife's little and very expensive fu fu dogs (sounds like a butterfly but the breed name eludes me right now) escaped out the door and was mob and fairly quickly died.

    after dealing with 'killer bees' and considering the potential liability in killin' a very cute and very expensive little dog I decided that would be my last cut out. for me the potential risk, current and long term, were just to great.
     
  7. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    thats why I always wear full gear from head to toe when I 1st look at a new trap out or removal, I check them out real good 1st for aggression before my wife even comes out of the van, if all is well then she gets out and I set her up 10 to 15 feet away in a chair for taking pictures and what not, always better to be safe then sorry.