HOT Bees!

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Eddy Honey, May 30, 2011.

  1. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    2 of my 3 hives are in the sun most of the day. With temps in the 90's today I noticed lots of what sounded like an exhaust fan coming from the hives with lots of bees fanning the entrance. I assume they are hot and are cooling the hive?

    I cleared an area just inside the tree-line in the forest where I could move them. It'd be about 100 yards. Should I:
    Leave them alone they're bees for cryin' out loud!;

    Move them as is at sunset and let them figure out where home is;

    Close up the hive at dark and then move them?

    Thanks,
    Ed
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    if you move it 100 yards in daylight you are going to loss a lot of your foraging bees. Im not sure about your area but we keep our hives in full sunlight because of small hive beetle. and it gets hot here in south central kansas. The fanning you are hearing is the bees cooling the hive and dehydrating the nectar. If you are running a screened bottom board crack the top cover and put a shim or stick under it between the top box and inner cover if you are using one. This will improve the ventilation and allow some of the heat to escape. I will also move my supers at a slight angle to the one under it to create a little gap for ventilation I think this would work far better than moving the hive and is a lot less trouble. I have never tried it but i have been told you can take a light piece of paper or feather and hold it at one side of the entrance and air flow will pull it in towards the hive. put it on the other side and it will blow out away from the hive.
     

  3. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Ok. I'm running a screened bottom board and have a small top entrance at the inner cover. I'll make some shims though.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Like the Rat says, far easier to help them ventilate than to move the hive. On really hot days I will just shift my top box forward (or back) so that there is a 1/2 inch gap at the front and back. You would be careful doing this during a dearth but otherwise no problem.

    By the way, HOT bees has a completely different meaning than bees that are too warm! :mrgreen:
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Make sure there is water somewhere around for them to get, they use the evaporating water to cool the hive also.
     
  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    perry exactly what i thought when i first seen the post figured he got lit up when checking a hive :D
     
  7. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I know perrybee lol. That's why I posted it. Folks love to read about accidents and destruction. Look at all the views I got lol!
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I have my hives in the sun and they can keep it at just the right temp. whatever the outside temp is. I have solid bottoms and no top vents. If they get too warm, they go out and set on the patio. "bearding'. I love to see a good size beard on my hives. It tells me they are doing fine.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would somewhat disagree on some of the post above...

    moving a hive a short distance and taking pains to move them a small step at a time really only confuses the field bees somewhat. they all seem to find home fairly quickly.

    having said that it sounds like ventilation is what you need to enhance. modifying entrances to include those like Perry suggest or adding an entrance at the top of the stack can greatly reduce excessive heat and crowding (the latter of which is one major component of the swarming impulse). a thin stick or building shim (little wedges use to set in doors and windows in home construction) set between boxes or between boxes and lids is really all that is required. if the population of the hive is robust you will likely need not worry about robbing. a weak or newly started hive you would want to take pains to limit any chance of robbing (although overheating in that kind of hive is very unlikely I would guess).
     
  10. milapostol

    milapostol New Member

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    Heh, heh...I thought the same thing, but I got a lot of good info out of reading this topic.
     
  11. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    Would it perhaps be beneficial to build some sort of cover to deflect the sun off the hives to keep them cooler? Maybe something easy to take down and put up at different times of the year and depending on weather? :confused:
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Just be careful doing it in Texas. SHB love shade, hate sun.