hot weather/cold weather and moving bees.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by tecumseh, May 26, 2012.

  1. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    an Iddee snip..
    I have moved everything from 2 hives on a 6 foot trailer to 520 hives on a semi. More details and maybe a pic and I might can help. I have strapped each hive, and strapped the load of pallets. I don't understand your question well enough to answer. Rather not answer than give bad info.

    tecumseh:
    I have always wondered Iddee if the weather (ie hot or cold) might dictate in which direction you face the entry when you move bees? secondly is the direction of the comb relative to the bed of the truck (of what ever size) important or not?

    a long time ago I myself made the migratory trip with bees from Texas to North Dakota and in both direction (generally in a fairly large farm truck) and at least somewhere along the line coming or going wondered about these two questions.

    I would guess the essence of the larger question is what do you want to make certain NOT to do and what should everyone have on hand in case of some emergency?

    tell us what you know or it is the thumb screw next :wink: .....
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Howdy tec.
    I always align my boxes so frames are inline with the truck. I guess the thought is if any frames are loose they won't rock back and forth with all the stop and starts.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    we called this clatter made by frames moving about 'the death rattle' Perry. over some long distance in moving bees we wanted a hive to set a spell prior to being moved so the frames were sealed together as one unit.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    "Death rattle" :shock: Sounds ominous but if you hear frames clacking together and there are bees in there you just know there's trouble. I usually try to do just as you suggest, let them sit for a few days to glue things up.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Too much involved to answer complete. Would take a book, and most of it the truck driver wouldn't know anyway. Here's a minute bit of it.

    The hives were palletized 4 hives per pallet and loaded 2 rows on the trailer, making 4 rows of hives. The entrances and frames were crossways of the trailer. The headboard, or headache rack, was solid. The air passing over and down the side would create a low pressure and draw air from the hives, keeping them cool without a direct draft. We would pick them up in Wisconson at well below freezing. By the time we got to Orlando, it was quite warm and they had broken cluster. Going north they were not clustered at either end. The truck had to keep moving, supplying an air flow, to keep them from overheating. Fuel was the only reason for stopping, and then for a minimum amount of time.

    About the only useful thing you can have, IMHO, is a quick way to contact the fire dept. The only thing I know to use in an emergency is the pumper truck and a spray nozzle. It will keep the bees cool and at bay until they can be returned to road speed.