How Carniolans handle warm summer temperatures?/ Successful requeening tips.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Kevin, Aug 13, 2013.

  1. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    What have been your experiences with Carniolans in warm regions?
    We have an average yearly temperature of 21 degrees C partly due to mild winters of 13 C and highs of 30 C in summer.
    I will be requeening my African hives next week and wonder what advice you may want to give me to help ensure a successful requeen :)

    Thanks all
    ‚ÄčKevin
     
  2. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    How to requeen with new strain ?

    I really need all the advice I can get to requeen my african hive with a european queen. Is there any advice you can give me, for her to be accepted best?
    I appreciate your experience may not be with Africans, but any help will be much appreciated.

    ‚ÄčKevin
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    You might be better to make a nuc to except the queen and once she is excepted and laying well then combine with the original colony. Pull a few frames and place them above an excluder so there are no brood young enough to be raised as a queen. When making the nuc shake bees off of frames of open brood which will be young nurse bees and place the frames of older brood with no young brood that could be made into a queen. Feed syrup during the the introduction of the queen can also aid in acceptance.
     
  5. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    The difference between the Italians and the Carnies is that they were stuck on different sides of the European alps for a few hundred years. They may have some different traits expressed, but are still the same insect. I have carnie/italian mutts and they seem to be happiest and most productive when temperatures are around 25 to 30 degrees. Hopefully some of the Florida beeks on here will chime in, because they have what seems to me a similar climate to yours. As for the re-queening (in addition to what others have mentioned) leave them queenless for about 24 hours before introducing a caged queen. A common problem with re-queening is that the new queen needs time to get into laying condition and start producing. The bees don't seem to recognise this and because the new queen is laying a lot less than the old one, they move to supersede her. This is why the Nuc re-queen described by ApisBees is much more reliable.
     
  6. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Season

    Is it winter now in Walvis Bay ? How much of a winter is it ?
     
  7. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    Thanks guys, this is where Im at. It is winter now, but up to about 20 C in the day and 12C at night. Spring next month.

    The 1 hive I have that I will requeen is looking pretty good at the moment. My queens will arrive on Sunday, what do I do before then?
    I will be getting another hive from a friend this weekend to requeen.

    My plan at the moment is to catch the current queen, put her into a queen cage, then leave the hive queenless for 24 hours and put the new queen in her cage into the hive between the two middle frames. What you think?
     
  8. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Watering Can Method

    Re-queening your scuts could be a hit or miss affair. I would suggest you try different methods with your new queens. You would feel sick if you tried the same method with all your new queens and the scuts rejected them.

    I have used the Watering Can Method with success. You start by making your old colony queenless. The next step is to use the watering can with the rose on to wet the bees in the brood box. The bees should be well soaked. The new queen goes in an introduction cage into the centre of the colony. The hive is now closed up and left for several days. I think the idea is that the workers go hard at cleaning up the water and gradually accept the smell of the new queen.
     
  9. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    If I get a good bunch of bees without brood and introduce my new queen to them, do you think that may make it easy to accept her?
     
  10. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    You will know how scuts can behave. I would imagine that a queenless bunch of bees without brood would not be happy and likely to be aggressive -----and maybe abscond.

    One technique of setting up mini mating nucs, was to set up --- bees, food and Q cell (or virgin) --- in the mini nuc. A number of these closed mini nucs would then be placed in a cool dark cellar for a few days. At the end of the time, the nuc could be moved to its outside position and the entrance opened.