how do you deal with false calls

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by thatguy324, Apr 3, 2013.

  1. thatguy324

    thatguy324 New Member

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    tell me some false calls you got and if you know how to avoid them i am putting my name out to get swarm calls so just looking for some advice
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I never got a false alarm---but on several occasions, by the time I got to answer the call, the swarm had moved on. :cry:
     

  3. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    Simpliest way is to ask for a close-up photo of the hive entrance via a cell phone camera or otherwise. Even halfway lousy pics will usually do. I've saved myself at least four or five fruitless trips with this.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    One of the questions I ask up here is, "what height are they going in at?"
    Anything low, like under a deck, or in the foundation near the ground, is almost never honeybees. I am always so surprised to see Zookeeps calls where the bees enter at almost ground level, I just never see that up here. Maybe 3 feet, but never much lower.
    And most calls I get are for Bumbles.:roll: :lol:
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    what pturley said, i don't do swarm calls, but i get plenty of phone calls from neighbors and others and have looked at plenty of yellow jackets and wasps, etc. don't ask them to describe the nest or the bee, cause they will just say, you know......they are bee's......:lol:

    know this really doesn't help you, but one more piece of advice, and a funny story.....tell them not to use a shotgun to blow the nest apart like my neighbors did......

    911 and a hornests nest

    good luck to you on taking swarm calls, others here will have better advice for you than i.....:grin:
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Swarm calls are NOT established hive calls. First, decide if you want swarms only or do removals, too. I do not recommend you do your first removal without a helper who has done them before. If you do, study hard beforehand. They are neither quick, simple, nor easy.

    Swarms are just that. A large ball of solid bees hanging in the open. Determine what they are and get a photo if possible.
     
  7. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    Questions I ask on every B-call.

    1. Are you sure they are Honeybees?
    2. Send pictures to my email or phone(if sent to my phone I send them to my email)
    3. Where are they located? (Tree,birdhouse,wall,dog house ect.) how high up
    4. How long have they been there?
    5. What have you done to get them to leave?( don't ask if they have sprayed them with poison, as often they wont tell you) with an open ended question you will often get a sraight answer
    6. For a removal I ask the caller if they are the property owner/manager.
     
  8. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Beware the cotoneaster

    There is one variety of low growing cotoneaster which has tiny flowers. At certain times it produces a nectar which is very attractive to bees. Members of the public see so many bees on the bush that they think it is a swarm.
     
  9. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    If you determine that it is a swarm ask them to keep an eye on them as you are in route to pick them up. If the bees decide to up and leave, the home owner can call you and save you the whole trip out.
     
  10. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    I am surprised at how few replies on this thread. When beeks get together they often swop swarm tales.

    The post from Bsweet is very good.

    In England, the police and local authorities regularly refer callers to the British BKA web-site. This site has pictures and descriptions of honeybees, wasps, bumbles and hornets. If the caller decides it is honeybees then using a Postcode (Zipcode ?) window a list of local swarm collectors is brought up.

    You still get calls for bumbles ...... Last year, bird box bumble calls were common.
     
  11. thatguy324

    thatguy324 New Member

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    i know i thought this thread would get a little more action too oh well
     
  12. Hawk

    Hawk New Member

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    Lol... Sorry - I've been out collecting swarms... ;)
    :wink:
     
  13. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Now that's just not fair! :lol:
     
  14. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Another line is...... "Have you (or a neighbour) contacted anyone else ?" You don't want two beeks going to the same swarm. If another beek has declined the call, there may be a good reason.
     
  15. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    It's happened to me! :roll:
    Arrived to find another box already sitting there picking up the stragglers.