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I am picking up two steers from the processor tomorrow, so my dog will be getting a lot of heart, liver, and other misc offal for a while. It's going to start turning cold and he needs good food to keep him warm in the winter. He seems to work the night shift and gets into arguments with the coyotes nearly every night, so he earns his keep. :)
 

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OK, so I'm going to temporarily hijack the thread. Went to the processor today where we had two steers and got a truckload of beef. Started out with 1154 lbs hanging weight. Ended up with a truck load that took up a chest freezer and two upright freezers. Lots of livers and hearts for the dog (so not a total hijack of the thread).

Edit: Oh, I forgot to say that I got the meat from a beekeeper in our association. I guess he's a beekeeper and a cattle keeper. :)

Another benefit of belonging to a local beekeeping association. Meeting other members of your community. :thumbsup:







 

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WOW!! that is better than 57%, it doesn't get any better than that!

Iddee that dog has you well trained! :lol:
 

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There are some well fed dogs on this forum!
 

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Don't feed all that 'offal' to the dog. Liver and onions is an excellent meal and pickled heart is quite a treat.
 

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Yikes Greg, look at all that! you must eat several pounds of beef a day! :shock:

Iddee, I thnk that's pretty cute. I had a banjo playing Italian friend who was a very BIG man, and he used to feed his beloved pet all-white cat from a little silver teaspoon while the cat sat on a tall stool in front of him- it was quite a sight. i miss them both.
 

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Growing up on the farm we had coonhounds in the house,one (old mike, dads favorite) would lay in chairs in the livingroom and he wouldn't give it up and nobody challenged him except mom and dad, but they had there own chair and one of us boys would have to set in a kitchen chair or on the floor. Otherwise he was a good natured dog and hunter. I vowed when i had my own home that there would be no dogs(or cats) in the house and i've kept that promise. Our English setter eats as good as we do and better when the grandkids are here.:lol: Ohh yes, about old mike(a black & tan). Dad traded him with boot, to a dog jocky for a half redbone tree dog (squirrel & possum) and dad told him he was mean, The dog jocky put him in a cage with 5 fox hounds and old mike killed 3 of them before they got him out. Mike never bit any of us, but would growl when we tried to get his chair.:roll: Jack
 

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My Dads brother Jim bred **** dogs in Illinois.We visited him in 76 and Dad and his bro. took me **** hunting.That was some of the most fun I ever had, running around in the woods at night.They treed one but it was summer time so we didn't shoot it.We went back in the day light,I couldn't believe I went running through those woods.It was probably better at night cause I didn't know what I was getting in to.
 

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Yikes Greg, look at all that! you must eat several pounds of beef a day! :shock:
I guess it's more of an investment. I expect the price of beef to skyrocket this year. I read today where the national cattle count was the lowest since 1952. I got a bargain, so I couldn't pass it up. I just hope the power doesn't go off for several days.

But there's me and my wife, and then my parents live on another house on the property, and we always run out of ground beef first. but I know there's no hormones or antibiotics in the meat, it's grass fed, and well taken care of, and that means a lot, too.
 

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And no horse neither. Sorry to all that live in the UK and have to deal with another screw up by a large company that is more concerned with the bottom line than the quality of products produced.
 

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I heard the cattle numbers are down to what they were in 1952? A neighbor was short on hay and sold some bred first calf heifers that brought $2,000.00 each.:shock: We give our son and daughters family a half a beef for Christmas every year, the processing now a day cost as much as i use to sell the steer for (a little over $300.00). The days of cheap food in the US of A is on it's way out, and it's not the farmers fault because everything he buys to operate has gone up too.:roll: Jack
 
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