How do you fix supers with worn contact surfaces?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by efmesch, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    After several years of good use, the corners of my supers get worn away because of my using the hive tool to pry them apart. Sometimes it's a result of scraping away accumulated wax or propolis. The super's body can be in excellent condition, but because of the wear, unintended entrances develop and make for problems such as robbing and allowing wax moths (and I asssume SHBs) to enter the hive. Sometimes a few weeds can plug the space or duct tape or something similar can make a temporary repair.
    Does anyone in the forum have a suggestion for a permanent, really good way to fix these "leaking' supers?
     
  2. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Some people use Bondo, wood putty or epoxy. I prefer to cut out the damaged portion and nail/glue in a replacement. If it is around the frame rests/short side nailing a cleat (1 by 2 inch) over the ends of the super is quite common. I made all the hive kits with end cleats last year to prevent such damage.
     

  3. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I also cut out the rotten piece on the table saw and then fashion a repair piece, little glue, a couple of nails and paint.......good as new.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I sell the hive for a couple hundred, buy a new one for a hundred, stick a nuc in it, and take the wife out to dinner with the change. :D :D
     
  6. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Iddee, I'm with you. I'd sell it, either with bees or without.
     
  7. rast

    rast New Member

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    Ditto.
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Like rast and G3, but I really like Iddee's idea! :thumbsup: :mrgreen: :lol:
     
  9. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Show your commitment by buying Idees damaged hives!
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I can only imagine how bad something Iddee wants to get rid of must look, did you see the picture of the tractor he just bought and tore apart! :shock: :lol:
     
  11. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Hey that tractor still had a full coat of paint!
     
  12. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Same as G3, rast and Perry. :thumbsup:

    If worn out box with bees goes for $200, how much he will ask for that tractor :confused: :lol: :lol:
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I can buy a new box for about 7 dollars. Sure would like to buy some new tractors for that.
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    psss.... just between us friends iddee... just whisper it in my ear here, so no one else can hear.... where ya' get them $7 boxes.

    ps... really what kind of a tractor are you over hauling??? nothing made in China I would guess <this did make me wonder can stuff made in China actually be repaired?

    after a bit of verbal/mental drifting tecumseh returns to the topic at hand...

    ef.... I obtained a promotion package at the north american bee conference a year ago in Galveston Texas. when I signed up I received a small sample from Aves Manufacturing (on the business card it say... www.avesstudio.com) of about what I suspect you are looking for. they evidently produce a wide assortment of repair materials (I would call the epoxies but their brochure says 'fine clays and maches'). i have never tried this stuff myself.

    I myself build a substantial cleat into my boxes which 1) acts as a handhold and 2) reinforces the thin material at the front and back top edge of each box and 3) gives me a bit of a flat surface for tilting the box above. the extra length add here to the boxes means my migratory tops are slightly longer also.

    sometimes in a pinch I have been known to repair stuff with thin metal and staples. most times (more so with the arrival of the shb) I simply burn the old stuff and start anew. I myself suspect (<speculating here for certain) that the shb loves old rotten and defective wood wares.
     
  15. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    No one has mentioned anything along the line I have been toying with (unsuccessfullly) for years---
    I'd like to find a heavy plastic u-shaped (or L-shaped) "track" that could be cut (or would come pre-cut) with 45 degree corners, that could be placed over the edge of the supers and simply cover up the damaged areas and provide a new surface. A "fancy" model could come with pre-drilled holes for attachment. There could even be a line, indented on one part and exdented on the other to make for a really good fit between one super and the one above it.
    I'm not certain if my description is clear enough to be understood. At any rate, if there would be a size for the bottoms and a different size for the narrowed edge of the tops (where the wood is cut for the shoulders of the frames) it could be fast, simple and long lasting.

    If the plastic would really be a good quality, it could even be transferred from one hive to another when you decide to sell the box and take your wife out for dinner. :D

    Tec, maybe you'll take out a patent on the idea and make a mint on selling them. :thumbsup:
    Just in case there is any doubt about it, I'm really serious about the idea. But there must be some basic fault in the concept, since no one (to my knowledge) has ever suggested this simple idea before. :confused:
    Tec--do you put your added cleat only on the froont ant back (I assume top and bottom) or around all four sides of the supers?
     
  16. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    efmesch
    I can't remember where I have seen it :confused: but I believe that there is something similar to what you are describing but it is made of metal. It sort of resembles a "picture frame" holder corner (for those old actual photographs, remember those) only larger. They were meant to be used from the get-go to save your corners rather than after they get weak.
    The only thing I wondered about was the thickness of them might not allow your box to sit flush on the one below
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I was also wondering how the increased distance between the frames would affect the bee space and possibly invite unwanted building of combs in the added area thus creating a new problem. :confused:
     
  18. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    efmesch writes:
    do you put your added cleat only on the froont ant back

    tecumseh:
    yep just the front and back. this does greatly help in keeping that thin bit of material abutting the frame rest to last much much longer. reason #3 (above) just kind of revealed itself after I began adding the cleats... in my quick check method for looking for queen cells this is a large enough + in itself for me <if I wished to resell these boxes this is something I likely would not do.

    #4 might be this bit of extra ledge 'stick out' also give you more leverage in prying with the hive tool.

    ef writes:
    I'd like to find a heavy plastic u-shaped (or L-shaped) "track" that could be cut (or would come pre-cut) with 45 degree corners.

    tecumseh:
    sounds kind of like 'stuff' you might obtain from a 'commercial' dry wall supply house... corners, beads, and bull nose are common terms at those kinds of places.
     
  19. Hawkster

    Hawkster New Member

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    Perry,
    is this what you are talking about ? looked interesting until I saw the price! http://www.ecobeebox.com/ecobeebox/Home.html. Actually the price isn't as bad as it was I think they had a problem with the order page because the price was something like 70 for 4 brackets...
     
  20. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hawkster:

    Nothing that elaborate, just something that covered the top corners by an inch or two. Those that you have linked are interesting but would they be cost effective?