How late is too late to pull supers?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Papakeith, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I'm hoping to get what honey I can pulled by the end of this week. But, I was curious as to how late (if ever) is too late to pull supers off of the bees. I've got a feeling that if I wait too long they will shuffle the honey stores down and I'll be out of luck until Spring
     
  2. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Would they pull it down if they didn't need it? In some climates if you wait till late some colonies will have all the stores up high and pulling it off then will leave them light. I have seen other hives quit filling supers and fill the top brood like they need and say p--- on the beekeeper. I guess it depends on what they have in stores and how it is arranged. If it is colder location I have the feeling that it is not desirable to start the winter off with the cluster in the top box.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I'm still removing the last of the supers, but I'm feeding those that are light. They are sucking up a half gallon a day so there is still plenty of time for them to back-fill the upper deep (up here anyways).
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    You can pull anytime throughout the year. But keep in mind if its to cold you cant feed a light hive. Something other to consider is the cooler it gets the slower honey flows unless you have a heated honey house. I have seen pics of Browns Honey pulling honey in the snow.
     
  5. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I would say pull them by 9pm at the latest. Otherwise you'll need a flashlight.....twice....the second time to see all the stingers you need to pull out :lol:
     
  6. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Whether the bees move honey can also depend on if a queen excluder is on the hive.

    As fall approaches and brood rearing slows the bees will back fill the cells that are not being used for brood. In some cases moving honey down from the honey supers. If a queen excluser was in use the cluster will be in the honey supers so the bees will fill with nectar or move honey to fill these cells below the excluder. If no excluder was used the bees may not move the honey as it is available to them for the cluster to move into as needed in the winter. They may also of had brood in the honey super and have been back filling the honey super as the brood emerged. If the queen has had access to the honey supers they may not move the honey down in to the brood supers as up to this point the honey above the cluster was available to them for the cluster to move into.

    The bees in all their manipulation of their brood area, honey stores, pollen reserves, never included or planned on a beekeeper coming and talking a portion of their reserves. So as we harvest honey remember to share nice.
     
  7. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Got 12 shallows to pull on Friday, QE still in the place on those hives.This is the latest I have ever harvested.
     
  8. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    I have 5 medium supers left to pull off of 3 strong hives. I may not extract them though depending on the build up in 3 weaker hives.
     
  9. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    GREAT POST ApisBees :thumbsup:

    Exactly what I found in my 2 yards. A month ago when pulled my extracting honey I left 12 shallows of comb honey filled anywhere between 60 and 70%, but not capped. Left a queen excluder in place, to make sure my honey is not tainted with brood.:smile:
    This weekend I found only one shallow of nicely capped honey:shock: The rest was taken downstairs.
    11 shallow boxes of nice clean candle wax :lol:
     
  10. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    We have a weed, broom weed, that starts blooming by mid September. It makes a strong and undesirable honey for people, but the bees love it. In brief, we can't harvest honey past mid September. My area is the eastern part of West Texas.
     
  11. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I just put supers on 10 days ago, will be leaving if the bees are working and shb/wax moth aren't presenting a problem. We shouldn't have a freeze for at least a month. I would not harvest honey at this time of year.
     
  12. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I finally had a chance to get out to the hives.
    I checked the deeps. most were pretty full, some were behind where they needed to be for the coming winter. By the time I was done all of the supers were off. Those that needed it got another dose of syrup. This will probably be the last feeding since night temps are starting to dip into the 40s now. At some point in November I'll wrap them up and call it done for my second year.