How long is too long?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Gator_56, Jul 6, 2012.

  1. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    I started this hive May 1st. of this year. I did an inspection 1 month ago tomorrow and found that they had built out 8 of the 10 frames so I added a new super. I have continually checked their process and to my surprise they have yet to start building on either the of the two frames left in the bottom box nor have they touched the frames in the top box.

    Some of you may remember I had SHB break-out and had to freeze five of my frames back at the end of May. After I took them out of the freezer and replaced them in the box the girls had them cleaned up and filled back out plus all of the other frames (minus the two still empty)within a week.

    So my question is, how long is too long for them to finish out those two frames and to start on the new box?
     
  2. brendantm130

    brendantm130 New Member

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    they may need a little feed to draw out the other frames. I don't know what kind of flow you may or may not have, but they need something to dew out frames
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    My guess is the two outer "filled" frames are mostly pollen and they aren't going any further. Move them out and foundation in and see what happens.
     
  4. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    Would it hurt to take a frame or two a trade them out with the top box as well? As long as there is no brood in them.

    Also the number one frame(as I call it) on the bottom box, is a brood frame.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    It wouldn't hurt. Just don't move the brood frames. Also put an empty in #1 spot.
     
  6. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    I'm going to do this now.... I'll take some pics.
     
  7. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    Ok so I just finished up my inspection and here is what I found and did. It was starting to mist rain so I didn't get to take as many pictures as I wanted.

    Here is frame #1...
    2012-07-07_16-21-00_788.jpg

    and this was frame #2...
    2012-07-07_16-22-53_168.jpg

    The next two frames were practically identical and then this was #5....
    2012-07-07_16-27-03_93.jpg

    The next 3 frames were filled out and almost full of honey and #9 and 10 were empty like number #5.


    I took number 1 and moved it to number 3 and took one of the empty frames and put in the 1 slot. I took two of the honey frames and moved up to the top box and placed empties in their place.

    I guess we will see what happens.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    has the most recent rain brought any flowers to your area? I would assume prior to the last little hurricane that blew through north Florida that you were in some kind of dearth situation?

    at a certain time of year (generally here anytime except spring) feeding a bit to get comb drawn is almost a requirement.
     
  9. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    I live right in the middle of town so I always assumed everyone around me watered as much we do. but maybe I should be feeding?
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    If you are wanting to know if you need to feed or not, give them a quart of syrup, if it is gone rather quickly (less than a day) then there is not anything for them to forage on (or their population is low), if they ignore it for he most part then they are working something.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    prior to the last 'hurricane' that passed thru north Florida I would guess yes to your question of feeding. after the rain perhaps not so much. suburbs are of course a better environment for the bee when a drought occurs but all that grass doesn't produce nectar and a lot of ornamental flowers likely don't produce much nectar either.

    as a general rule for most new beekeeper I often suggest that they consider..... 'feed them till they are one full box of bees'.