HOW TO FIX THIS???

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by arkiebee, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. arkiebee

    arkiebee New Member

    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    OK - last summer when I caught a swarm, I put an inner feeder on it during the fall to give them a boost for food. These bees built their comb up in underneath the inner feeder and now it is STUCK on the hive body. They have survived all winter and there seems to be a lot of bees, but I need to get that feeder off. This weekend it is suppose to be in the 60's (YEAH!) and I thought I would:
    1. Twist the inner feeder off - to break the burr comb
    2. Clean off all the burr comb that will be on the top bars of the hive body
    3. Put another hive body on top
    4. Put some 1:1 syrup on them via a boardman feeder - along with a pollen pattie

    SO what do you think? Is this a way to fix my little dilema???

    ALSO I still have dry sugar on my other bees along with a pollen pattie. Can I still put some 1:1 on them and leave the dry sugar on for a while? We have had below normal temps here in Arkansas and I know the cold isn't over with yet by a long shot?

    THANKS for your wise advise!

    We are FINALLY seeing some warmer temps here - they are slow getting here - but the long range forecast is in the 40's, 50's and that is so much better than what we have had. This time last year, I had early spring flowers blooming, they are Just now starting to start to bud and will probably bloom in a week or so. I even had "hen-bit" blooming early last year and this year not much at all. So my bees still need feed - but when I peeked under the hood a couple of weeks ago, some of my hives still had honey and they haven't touched much of the sugar, but some have already been into the dry sugar.

    I consider myself lucky because so far all of my hives are still alive and kicking.....I mean buzzing!
     
  2. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You can also try running a long knife or hacksaw blade between the two, all the way around. It will cut at least some of the comb.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I second the long knife. I use a long serrated blade like a bread knife, I stole it from my wife and I really think it is a ginsu (sp) knife and works great on doing cut outs.

    G3
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    two wood handles and a bit of tensioning wire can be used to slice between the hive bodies.

    the burr comb generally means the hive has been robust.

    depending oh hive weight and how much you want to boost the hives would determine the feeding decision for me. sounds like they could likely use an extra hive body.

    with the first bloom an active hive should clear out the sugar on their own.
     
  5. arkiebee

    arkiebee New Member

    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I never even thought of using a knife or something to cut the comb with - I have just the knife for it,too!

    Sunday looks like the best day this weekend. I'll give it a go after church and see how much of a mess I can make.

    THANKS!!
     
  6. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The wire method that tec mentioned is much faster and the one I prefer.

    A second person to help pull up on side of the box also really helps. :thumbsup:

    A third person might be handy to stand by with a smoker if you decide to whack away with a knife and it takes awhile.... :lol:
     
  7. arkiebee

    arkiebee New Member

    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Got my cut-out done today..oh yeah! :yahoo:

    It wasn't as hard to do as I thought. Those bees had honey stuck in every nook and cranny underneath that feeder, so I scraped it off and put it on top of the 2nd hive body I added along with a pollen pattie so they can clean it out. What was left we moved a few yards away so the bees could take the leftovers and return to their hives. These bees had filled...I mean filled...that hive body to the brim. I had a ton of bees in there. They won't know what to do with all that room on the 2nd floor of their home now.

    I have put the 1:1 on them and I noticed that some still had dry sugar on the top so I left that too ...was that ok to do? We are so lucky, the temps have really warmed up here now and the hen-bit is blooming along with other small wildflowers and the bees are all over everything. I know winter is not over, but we are having a hey-day down here because we haven't had temps in the 60s & 70s in forever it seems.

    When do I need to reverse my hive bodies?
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would leave the sugar. Maybe they will use it and maybe not.

    If the queen is laying in the bottom box you would have no need to reverse. very shortly (actually it is a task I do regularly here now) you might wish to make certain the bottom board is clean..... I usually do this in conjunction with reversing the boxes. I also would look closely at the 9 or 10 frames in the bottom box and make certain that there is no single frame limiting brood expansion horizontally. sometimes this can be a frame of solid pollen or on occasions two consecutive frames of capped honey. the idea being to move empty frames to the center of the brood nest and frames like capped honey or a solid frame of pollen to the outside walls.

    ps.... via small slats of wood I add a bit of space beyond the 'bee space' in almost all my covers. I call this a blow out valve since quite typically a hive will fill this space with burr comb (just as they seem to have done on your hive) before the hive get around to swarming. this extra air space also seems to help here in the hot summer months.